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D7000v2 Nighthawk - WAN speed limit max ~150Mbit (potential solution)

spexau
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D7000v2 Nighthawk - WAN speed limit max ~150Mbit (potential solution)

Hi all,

 

I found a few threads on here regarding issues with the Nighthawk D7000v2 and issues reaching more than 140/150Mbit on a WAN connection. People had recommended factory reset, ensure QoS was turned off, etc but no real solution.

I recently upped my NBN HFC (Australia) plan to 250/25 and ran into the same issue and just wanted to advise how I resolved it in case people come across this thread. As anyone would know Googling and finding a bunch of threads with your issue but never a solution is painful!

 

Anyway, the solution.

 

ADVANCED -> Advanced Setup -> Traffic Meter

 

By default this is enabled but set to No Limit. But it appears to keep track of the amount of traffic that's being sent up and down stream in the Internet Traffic Statistics. My theory is this is using up a decent amount of CPU power on the router and limiting the throughput.

 

Untick "Enable Traffic Meter" and Apply.

 

For me this instantly fixed the issue once it processed the change. I went from a slow ramp up in Speedtest.net to 145Mbit to almost instant 255Mbit. It also dropped the ping from 8ms to 4ms but unsure of the real world applications here.

 

Hopefully this helps people who have tried and failed, returned the router, or downgraded their connection out of frustration!

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Re: D7000v2 Nighthawk - WAN speed limit max ~150Mbit (potential solution)


@spexau wrote:

 

I found a few threads on here regarding issues with the Nighthawk D7000v2 and issues reaching more than 140/150Mbit on a WAN connection.

 

A complicating factor here is that the D7000v2 is a DSL modem/router. It won't work with as a modem on NBN HFC and DSL canlt deliver 250/25.

 

So it is probably running in router mode. The general advice for routers running slow, repeated here many tines, is to disable anything that strains the router's processor. This means traffic metering and, probably more important, QoS. At speeds like that QoS just gets in the way.

 

Another trick is to look at the router's logs. If they are full of entries, especially DoS Attacks, which are mostly spurious, then disable the logging. That too uses processor power.

 

Just another user.

My network DM200 -> R7800 -> GS316 -> PL1000 -> Orbi RBR40 -> Orbi RBS50Y -> RBS40V
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