Reply

Power Adapter Amperage for Router

JV6
Aspirant
Aspirant

Power Adapter Amperage for Router

My Wifi router quit unexpectedly the other night after many years of faithful service.  I suspected a power problem since the device was completely off.  The 'brick' said it was a 12v 5amp model.  I could not locate a same model in my box of power adapter.  But, I did find a 12v 1.5amp model used for one of my external hard drives.  

 

It worked great!

 

Now my question is everything okay?   I have checked the temperature on the power supply and it is a cool as any of my other plugged in devices.  What can go wrong with a lower amp power supply? 

 

And when you think about it, why does a router supposedly require 3 times the amperage when compared to a external harddrive that drives an electrical motor and generates quite a bit of heat.?  It just seems like the WNDR4500 doesn't really need 5 amps.  

Model: WNDR4500|N900 Wireless Dual Band Gigabit Router|EOL
Message 1 of 8
wcalifas
Virtuoso

Re: Power Adapter Amperage for Router

It wil probably work but it will probably die faster than expected (the power brick) that is.

Message 2 of 8
plemans
Guru

Re: Power Adapter Amperage for Router

Or if you start putting a load on it (many devices, high usage, multiple usb drivers, etc) it can shut down/reboot. You have to remember that they have to design the power supply for the highest power scenario that the router will draw. The vast majority of the time, it doesn't. Which is why a lower powered power supply can work. It can just create issues depending on the load on the router. 

Current Setup: CM2000-> RBK750-> GS716v2-> RAXE500-> Pi-hole->
Message 3 of 8
wcalifas
Virtuoso

Re: Power Adapter Amperage for Router

It will also go a little slower when loading a page and everything else, etc.
Message 4 of 8
antinode
Guru

Re: Power Adapter Amperage for Router

> [...] The 'brick' said it was a 12v 5amp model. [...]

 

   That would seem to agree with the specs in the WNDR4500 User Manual.
But the WNDR4500v2 and WNDR4500v3 User Manuals say 2.5A.

 

   What's printed on the router product label?  Even there, an error
would not be Netgear's first.

 

> [...] why does a router supposedly require 3 times the amperage [...]

 

   Radio transmitters?  If I were curious about the actual current
requirement, then I might get a suitable ammeter, and measure the actual
current (under a variety of operating conditions).

 

   I'll admit that I'd expect 60W to melt a package like that.

Message 5 of 8
antinode
Guru

Re: Power Adapter Amperage for Router

> It will also go a little slower when loading a page and everything
> else, etc.

 

   Just when you think that you've heard all the nonsense that could
possibly exist on a subject, someone comes along and creates more.

Message 6 of 8
JV6
Aspirant
Aspirant

Re: Power Adapter Amperage for Router

My router has 5A stamped on the side.  The failed bricked did match that. I was surprised to hear about other very similar models with 2.5A requirements.  I was now rethiinking my issue.  It may be that I am not taxing the router to it's full potential.  I have only one wired connection, where there is really room for several  Then I can only image the length of the wired connections.  If I used wired connections to devices I have in the most distant locations of the house,  then I would have wires 40ft long.  Then it would need power to boost signals through all the copper.  But are we not talking voltage and not amps.  Just not sure.  If I plugged an external hard drive in to the back of the router, does that also suck up some amps?   

 

I guess I can to do one of two things:  Continue with the under amp-replacement I have. If don't add any more devices/demands, then I may be just fine. Of course I will need to constantly monitor performance and temperature.  Or,  I can just buy a new brick.  I think they are about $10 on Amazon.  

Model: WNDR4500v2|N900 Wireless Dual Band Gigabit Router
Message 7 of 8
antinode
Guru

Re: Power Adapter Amperage for Router

> [...] My router has 5A stamped on the side. The failed bricked did
> match that. [...]

 

   All I know is what I've measured, which is nothing, but I wouldn't
rule out a clerical error where "2.5A" got read/written as "5A"
someplace along the line.

 

> [...] I was surprised to hear about other very similar models with
> 2.5A requirements.

 

   Visit http://netgear.com/support , put in each model number, and look
for Documentation.  Get the User Manual (at least).  Read.  Look for
"Technical Specifications".

 

> [...] Then it would need power to boost signals through all the
> copper. [...]

 

   I doubt it.  And I'd expect the power involved in an Ethernet
connection to be pretty small.


> [...] If I plugged an external hard drive in to the back of the
> router, does that also suck up some amps?

 

   It might, if the external device gets all its power from its USB
connection, but, again, USB power tends to be limited, too.

 

> [...] I will need to constantly monitor performance and temperature.
> [...]

 

   Occasionally, perhaps.

 

> [...] Or, I can just buy a new brick. [...]

 

   You've determined that the old one was your problem.  If a new
(same-rated) one is readily available and cheap, then the one in your
junk box has already done its job.  Less worry is often good.

Message 8 of 8
Discussion stats
  • 7 replies
  • 819 views
  • 0 kudos
  • 4 in conversation
Announcements

Orbi WiFi 6E