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Novice
Posts: 0
Registered: ‎2012-02-07

Which is better

54% at 162Mbps or 68% at 64Mbps


What do you think since I am completely new to this

Thanks
Virtuoso
Posts: 12,951
Registered: ‎2015-07-05

Re: Which is better

You can’t tell which is better from those figures, you need to run a throughput test, e.g. take a look at IPerf / JPerf.
Novice
Posts: 0
Registered: ‎2012-02-07

Re: Which is better

How do I do that?
Novice
Posts: 0
Registered: ‎2012-02-07

Re: Which is better

can you do a test from computer to TV?
Guide
Posts: 1,134
Registered: ‎2011-11-12

Re: Which is better

Since it's wireless, you're looking at half that for actual speed.
Virtuoso
Posts: 12,951
Registered: ‎2015-07-05

Re: Which is better

joedtrucker wrote:
How do I do that?


If you Google iPerf you should find some instructions, it's not particularly difficult but really needs two computers for the test.
Aspirant
Posts: 262
Registered: ‎2011-09-22

Re: Which is better

I don't understand what you mean with those percentages or how you obtained them. Are the Mbps link rates? How did you obtain them as well?

The most important measure of a network's performance is data throughput - the speed of transfer of data from one location (server, desktop, NAS, notebook, etc) to another on your Local Area Network (LAN). Throughput can be measured with a number of different applications such as iperf/jperf, LAN Speed Test, etc. You will need two computers setup on your LAN to do throughput testing. It has nothing to do with televisions.

I can help you with using iperf/jperf, having used both on Windows XP-based computers.

Please describe what it is you want to do and what hardware and operating system you use.
Novice
Posts: 0
Registered: ‎2012-02-07

Re: Which is better

I don't understand what you mean with those percentages or how you obtained them. Are the Mbps link rates? How did you obtain them as well?

Yes link rates from genie on network map page

I just want to know what kind of signal (strength, consistency, drops) I am getting from my router to my TV which is 30' away. I would like to try this on the 5GHz and 2.4GHz to see which is better. I guess that I can just sit and watch a streaming program but I would like the data to back it up. Does that make sense?

Win 7
Intel 2500k@3.7
8GB
Gigabyte GA-768
EVGA 560ti
Aspirant
Posts: 262
Registered: ‎2011-09-22

Re: Which is better

Don't use Netgear Genie to gauge link rates or throughputs and from what I've seen I don't put much stock in what it reports.

Don't know how you can do what you want when the client is a TV. Is there an app on the TV or something in the set up that provides something of what you want?

If you can borrow a notebook computer with a wireless NIC adapter card that is dual band (2.4 and 5 GHz), set up a LAN with your desktop and notebook, then you can do testing to get an idea of signal intensity and throughputs.

Otherwise you can just try both bands and different channels within each band and see how well your TV functions. Don't forget that position of the wireless router in space (up/down, left/right, forward/backward) can play a critical role in performance.

Remember, link rates are collateral information. Throughput is the critical data for your purposes.
Aspirant
Posts: 262
Registered: ‎2011-09-22

Re: Which is better

If you have a cell phone that uses apps, maybe you can find and use something like WiFi Analyzer to get an idea of signal intensity of the router while standing at the TV. Also, an app like this can help you understand crowding on the 2.4 GHz band by your neighbor's wireless signals. You can use that to see why one channel may be better to select for your use than another.

Keep in mind that even if there are other wireless routers using the same channel as you, what matters is if they are transmitting data or just place sitting. Three idle neighbors occupying the same channel as you will not affect your throughput but one neighbor on the same channel as you who moves lots of data (like watching HD movies from his server or downloading large files) can dramatically decrease your router's performance. This is why you should test channels to see how they perform, even at different times of day when your neighbors are home and using their networks.
Virtuoso
Posts: 12,951
Registered: ‎2015-07-05

Re: Which is better

The communication between router and client is obviously a two way street, and without being able to run a throughput test at the client what will be seen using another client at the same location will simply be a ‘rule of thumb’. For a TV what will matter most is quality of service rather than peak throughput, a steady lower rate (assuming it meets the bitrate needs for streaming), is better than a higher throughput with potential dropouts which is what might occur at the very high link rates if there are a number of neighbouring networks.
Novice
Posts: 0
Registered: ‎2012-02-07

Re: Which is better

Tried "lan speed test" on my laptop placed at the heigth of my TV app 30' away from my router. Tried 2.4 and 5GHz-

2.4= Writing Packet length 100,000,000 reading 100,000,000
Time to complete 29.4262081 17.8089799
Bytes per second 3,398,331 5,615,145
Bits per second 27,186,648 44,921,160
Mbps 27.1866480 44.9211600

5GHz=Writing 100,000,000 reading 100,000,000
Time to complete 28.4327469 18.5828428
Bytes per second 3,517,071 5,381,308
Bits per second 28,136,568 43,050,464
Mbps 28.1365680 43.0504640

Any thoughts on the results? Thanks again for all your help
Aspirant
Posts: 262
Registered: ‎2011-09-22

Re: Which is better

If you are transmitting BluRay quality video then you may experience problems no matter what with your current set up. BluRay may require up to 52 Mbps depending on the scene in the video. Usually these are temporary spikes but you will still need sufficient bandwidth to meet the demands of the video you intend to watch.

Your LAN Speed Test results look equivalent. What counts is sustained throughput over time since you will require steady and sufficient bandwidth. You do not want significant variation in data throughput that drops below a certain Mbps or else your video will stutter or stop to buffer.

Either band may work for you but it depends on several factors, some out of your control: obstacles to signal such as home construction, interference from other wireless signals of neighbors on the 2.4 GHz band, electrical devices that cause interference, position of the wireless router, etc.

Install inSSIDer on the notebook. This will give you an idea of other wireless signals on both bands (including your own if you broadcast your SSID's), what channels they are using, and the signal intensity of each signal (RSSI). You can use this information to help understand why one channel you use may be better or worse to use. But even this is not entirely all to it - there may be 3 signals from neighbors on one channel "A" and be a better channel to use than another channel "B" with only one neighbor signal if channel A is rarely used by your neighbors (specifically rarely used to move large amounts of data) while channel B is heavily used by one neighbor. The best thing you can do is experiment with different channels if you cannot find an unoccupied channel 1, 6, or 11 at the start on the 2.4 GHz band. Since the 5 GHz band has a much more limited range than 2.4 GHz, it might be that the 5 GHz band is the best choice for avoiding interference from neighborhood signals. You will need to try both bands and multiple channels to determine what is best at the time of testing.

As Mars Mug suggested QoS (Quality of Service) could be helpful to you. QoS is a firmware setting(s) that tells the router to dedicate bandwidth to certain functions/clients at the expense of bandwidth to other functions/clients that may be operating at the same time. Video, online gaming, and VOIP are typical functions that can benefit from dedicated bandwidth to keep them smoothly performing. You can download the User Manual PDF from Netgear's 3800 web page for details on QoS and how to set it up. Then you can experiment and find out what works best, if at all, for you.
Novice
Posts: 0
Registered: ‎2012-02-07

Re: Which is better

If I am streaming HULU plus, Netflix, VUDU etc...would that be considered the Blu-Ray cuality video?
Aspirant
Posts: 262
Registered: ‎2011-09-22

Re: Which is better

As far as I know - no.
Guide
Posts: 1,134
Registered: ‎2011-11-12

Re: Which is better

joedtrucker wrote:
If I am streaming HULU plus, Netflix, VUDU etc...would that be considered the Blu-Ray cuality video?


Yes it can if you have the right hardware. I have a Roku 2 player and can stream at 1080P with no problem. Easily Blu Ray quality. And you can set your Netflix video quality on their web site.
Novice
Posts: 0
Registered: ‎2012-02-07

Re: Which is better

Hi there, according to inSSIDer no one is on channel eleven on 2.4GHz and I have RSSI of -40

on the other hand there is no one on 5GHz and I have RSSI of -60

So what that means I am not sure
Novice
Posts: 0
Registered: ‎2012-02-07

Re: Which is better

I guess I am a little confused, so any explanation would be fantastic.
1) Why does my link rate lower at different times "on net genie" while "speedtest results" remain the same?
2) Why does CNET's testing of the 3800 "On the 5GHz band, it averaged 89.6Mbps in close-range (15 feet) throughput tests and 74.7Mbps in long-range (100 feet) tests." under supposed office setting with walls and everything- seems inconsistent with what I am getting here at my humble home.
3) Does "video mode" activated effect streaming netflix. hulu etc..positively?

Again. thanks for all the help
Aspirant
Posts: 262
Registered: ‎2011-09-22

Re: Which is better

sabretooth wrote:
Yes it can if you have the right hardware. I have a Roku 2 player and can stream at 1080P with no problem. Easily Blu Ray quality. And you can set your Netflix video quality on their web site.

Definitely not BluRay specs but still quite watchable.

See section 2.4 for a comparison between BluRay and DVD. Data transfer rates for Bluray are too high for most people's internet bandwidth. Some sort of compression or loussy calculation, heavy reliance on buffering, or both, is used to stream movies. Even with buffering, I doubt customers are going to order a movie and then wait many minutes for sufficient buffering to occur, let alone the real prospect of another lengthy pause in the movie to again buffer. Then there is the cost to the company for all that bandwidth to support up to 54 Mbps streaming.
Aspirant
Posts: 262
Registered: ‎2011-09-22

Re: Which is better

joedtrucker wrote:
Hi there, according to inSSIDer no one is on channel eleven on 2.4GHz and I have RSSI of -40

on the other hand there is no one on 5GHz and I have RSSI of -60

So what that means I am not sure

RSSI is a measure of signal intensity but it is only a rough measurement and should be regarded with a grain of salt and in the context of a number of variables.

From what you've written, Channel 11 sounds like the best choice on the 2.4 GHz band since no one else occupies it. You'll need to see how various channels on the 5 GHz band perform for that specific location.

Your best band and channel selection is determined by trying them out. It helps to make objective decisions based on throughput and the stability of that throughput over time (instead of a single short test). Using iperf/jperf, LAN Speed Test or other free software to test throughput is preferred over just watching your TV for problems, but you test things out the best you can.

Start experimenting with channels on different bands and record results as objectively as possible. No one can tell you which band or channel will be the best for you since there are more variables than RSSI and bandwidth frequency.
Aspirant
Posts: 262
Registered: ‎2011-09-22

Re: Which is better

joedtrucker wrote:
I guess I am a little confused, so any explanation would be fantastic.
1) Why does my link rate lower at different times "on net genie" while "speedtest results" remain the same?

Firget relying on Netgear's Genie for link rate or throughput. Not sure what you mean about "speedtest results".

2) Why does CNET's testing of the 3800 "On the 5GHz band, it averaged 89.6Mbps in close-range (15 feet) throughput tests and 74.7Mbps in long-range (100 feet) tests." under supposed office setting with walls and everything- seems inconsistent with what I am getting here at my humble home.

The operating environment conditions are different between your home and CNET's lab: building construction, furniture or other objects in the way of signal, other wireles signal interference, electrical devices that interfere, clients used (NIC adapter cards and shielding withing the clients to prevent signal interference), etc.
3) Does "video mode" activated effect streaming netflix. hulu etc..positively?

That's the hope - you will have stable and sufficient throughput going from the router to the client receiving the wireless data stream.
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