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Re: Ethernet Port link aggregation

joe_wht
Luminary

Ethernet Port link aggregation

I've been trying th Ethernet Port link aggregation  & the 2.5 gig Multi gig port options.

When trying the aggregation on mhy ReadyNAS 214 it Slows my web browsing & File access WAY DOWN!!

When trying the multi gig in the 2.5gig mode.. I get nothing.. so I revert back to 1gig.

... 1 of my Questions is.. When Aggregating 2 ports to get 2 gig OUT and there's 3 remaining ports limited to1 gig

WHERE IS THE Benifit ??   ( note: my ReadyNAS seems to be Blazing Fast in port 2 when using SMB )

I was hoping to get faster speed between my ReadyNAS & MacBook Pro.

..

What would be my best setup??   Here's my setup:

Netgear Nighthawk AX12 RAX200 
Netgear Modem CM600 (up to 400Mbps) <My speed tests: 230 Mbps Down/ 10up>
ReadyNAS RN214
2 - Netgear switches. GS116NA (1= Roku, Dish Hopper, Printer. 2nd= Office PC, Roku, Joey, Bose, Nest Hub)
Dish Hopper(2 ports, I only use 1) +2 Joeys
3- Roku
Philips 50” TV 50PFL5766
8 Nest Cams + 3 Nest Hubs
( 42 Wireless & 18 Wired devices)

Screen Shot 2021-06-18 at 5.19.49 PM.png

Model: RAX200|Nighthawk Tri-band AX12 12-Stream Wi-Fi 6 Router
Message 1 of 9

Accepted Solutions
Razor512
Virtuoso

Re: Ethernet Port link aggregation

To be more specific, for your setup, I would recommend the following.

 

  • Enable Ethernet port aggregation on the RAX200 and connect ports 1 and 2 to the 2 Ehternet ports on the NAS (having its Ethernet aggregation enabled as well) (usually the "new bond" setting in the network settings tab of the readyNAS and it will need to bond using layer 2+3). Many ReadyNAS devices will not auto detect a link aggregation, thus it has to be enabled in the network settings, otherwise it will just use one or the other port but never both at once.
  • Using either Ethernet port 3 or 4 of the router, connect it to your 16 port gigabit switch.
  • For the multi-gig port, check if your main PC has a 2.5GbE or better Ethernet port, if not, then buy a NIC such as an RTL8125 based one, the prices fluctuate a lot, but on a good week, you can find some in the $12-15 range, and on a bad week, they can be in the $25 range). You will then connect the multi-gig port to your main PC so that it will have the full 2Gbps from the NAS when performing backups and other transfers.
  • For your WiFi clients, your main laptop should have a good 802.11ax WiFi adapter, if needed, upgrade to an Intel AX200 WiFi adapter (typically around $17-$19), of it you want to eventually move to the 6GHz band, then the Intel AX210 which will go for about $25-$30. If in the same room as the router on the 5GHz band, you will get around 1.8Gbps real world throughput, and often depending on the building materials and room size, you can still hold over 1Gbps even 1-2 rooms away.

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Message 3 of 9

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Razor512
Virtuoso

Re: Ethernet Port link aggregation

With the RAX200, you have the ability to use LACP between ports 1 and 2.

 

Then ports 3 and 4 will run at 1GbE, thus wired clients will top out at 1 gigabit, but 2 of those wired clients can still access the NAS at the same time and likely get a slowdown from each other. You also have the multi-gig port that will do 5Gbps/ 2.5Gbps/ 1Gbps.

This means that any PC with a multigig port, e.g., a modern mothrrboard with a built in 2.5GbE port, or if you have one of those $12-15 2.5GbE NICs, then that will get the full 2Gbps from the NAS.

 

Then you have the WiFi. The RAX200 will get roughly 1.8Gbps in real worth throughput on a 2 stream 160MHz client such as an Intel AX200.

Message 2 of 9
Razor512
Virtuoso

Re: Ethernet Port link aggregation

To be more specific, for your setup, I would recommend the following.

 

  • Enable Ethernet port aggregation on the RAX200 and connect ports 1 and 2 to the 2 Ehternet ports on the NAS (having its Ethernet aggregation enabled as well) (usually the "new bond" setting in the network settings tab of the readyNAS and it will need to bond using layer 2+3). Many ReadyNAS devices will not auto detect a link aggregation, thus it has to be enabled in the network settings, otherwise it will just use one or the other port but never both at once.
  • Using either Ethernet port 3 or 4 of the router, connect it to your 16 port gigabit switch.
  • For the multi-gig port, check if your main PC has a 2.5GbE or better Ethernet port, if not, then buy a NIC such as an RTL8125 based one, the prices fluctuate a lot, but on a good week, you can find some in the $12-15 range, and on a bad week, they can be in the $25 range). You will then connect the multi-gig port to your main PC so that it will have the full 2Gbps from the NAS when performing backups and other transfers.
  • For your WiFi clients, your main laptop should have a good 802.11ax WiFi adapter, if needed, upgrade to an Intel AX200 WiFi adapter (typically around $17-$19), of it you want to eventually move to the 6GHz band, then the Intel AX210 which will go for about $25-$30. If in the same room as the router on the 5GHz band, you will get around 1.8Gbps real world throughput, and often depending on the building materials and room size, you can still hold over 1Gbps even 1-2 rooms away.
Message 3 of 9
joe_wht
Luminary

Re: Ethernet Port link aggregation

Thanks for that info !! ..

Question.. In prior years Qos created problems.

With the Nighthawk RAX200 will Qos properly work?

The RAX200 does handle my Nest cams dang good,

Much better than the R8500 & prior routers. Even through

I had priorities set on everything.

I've got the front 5 cams divided between the 5Ghz

and the rear cams on 2.4.

-- Just wondering if I should turn Qos back on.

Message 4 of 9
Razor512
Virtuoso

Re: Ethernet Port link aggregation

For the QOS if set up properly, along with the right connection, it can work well.

One of the main issues with current implementations of QOS for all major routers, is the requirement that the upload and download throughput be specified. In my case, QOS works great since I have a fiber internet connection (verizon fios) where the throughput is consistent throughout the day. With some ISPs, e.g., some cable providers, depending on the area, and if there is any competition or not, you can be on an oversold node where the throughput fluctuates throughout the day. This means that whatever speed you set the QOS to, will be in accurate relative to the actual throughput.

 

While you can set the speeds to the lowest common denominators, it will mean that your speeds end up being capped by the QOS setting. Or if you set it to the average or peak speeds, then during the times when the set speed matches or is lower than the actual throughput, then QOS will actually perform some traffic shaping, but in the times when the actual throughput is lower than the QOS specified speeds, then even when enabled, the QOS will not have a noticeable impact on the connection, and it will not fix congestion issues.

 

If your ISP has very inconsistent speeds, then I recommend not enabling QOS, as you will end up with it not doing anything, or you will end up with it capping your speeds depending on the values set.

 

If your speeds are pretty consistent, then try enabling it and doing a few tests such as a large download while streaming video.

 

PS, for the nighthawk series, they still do not give granular control over the QOS entries, instead they use a L7 filter database where priorities are assigned to a huge range of traffic types, and it identifies the type of traffic and assigns a priority. While it is quite thorough, one area that I wish Netgear would provide more info on, is how exactly does it prioritize uncategorized traffic relative to bulk traffic. For example, if you are using some obscure service that is not in the database, and you are also downloading a bunch of games or anime, will the bulk traffic be prioritized below that of the uncategorized traffic?

 

 

Message 5 of 9
joe_wht
Luminary

Re: Ethernet Port link aggregation

Gottcha.. I'll leave it alone.

When I'm not home my cams are divided up between the 3 wifi networks.

When home only the front cams are on and 90% of what I use is ethernet connected.

I do have a lot of wifi plugs, all on 2.4 that are just sitting & waiting to be used.

Thanks so much for sharing your knowledge !!

- Joe

Message 6 of 9
joe_wht
Luminary

Re: Ethernet Port link aggregation

HEY.. I just mentioned my R8500 router..

Would hooking it up to the 2.5g port give me better port access & speeds

over the Netgear Switch?

For some reason my HP printer MUST be plugged into my router instead of the switch

for my printer to recognize a connection.

If I used the printers Wifi .. it takes 30-90 seconds for it to start printing which I HATE !

Message 7 of 9
Razor512
Virtuoso

Re: Ethernet Port link aggregation

For the multi-gig port, tyou will only get a speed benefit is both endpointsa are multi-gig. for example, if you have a switch with a 2.5GbE uplonk, then it will get a speed benefit from being connected to the multi-gig port, but if your switch has only 1GbE ports, then connecting it to the 2.5GbE port on the router will not offerany benefit as the PHY rate will still be 1GbE.

 

 

In your case, the GS116NA will not benefit from being connected to the multi-gig port.

Message 8 of 9
Razor512
Virtuoso

Re: Ethernet Port link aggregation

Sorry, lots of typos.

 

Anyway, in the case of uusing the multi-gig port, you will only get a benefit if the device connected to it is a 2.5GbE or higher device. This means any device with 1GbE only ports, as well as ones like the NAS which use 2 1GbE ports that can be teamed via LACP, will not benefit from the multi-gig port.

 

This is why to get the highest overall performance from the NAS, will be to use the port aggregation for the 1 1GbE ports for the NAS, and then the 2.5GbE port for a multi-gig capable deivce, and then a basic 1GbE port for the switch since all of its ports are 1GbE, and will not benefit from a faster port for its uplink.

Message 9 of 9
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