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Upgrade Jitters

I have a new CM1200 and RAX120 on the way to upgrade my existing Cisco DPC3008 and Asus RT-N66U setup. I only have a 150mbps through xfinity so I’m not expecting miracles on throughput... some of the reasons for upgrading: maximize my network, upgrade hardware, maybe reduce pings on my WiFi connected Nintendo Switch... I get 85mbps download on 2.5ghz over N and 127mbps on the 5ghz but the 5g signal is very spotty so we run everything only on 2.5ghz. A little more range would help too, even on 2.5, the outside patio coverage is weak... I think AC would help me get closer to the 150mbps. My modem works but it’s no longer supported, no more firmware updates, it is only 8 streams down so I’m thinking a few more streams wouldn’t hurt, especially when we have 5 iPads and 2 TVs streaming at the same time - plus I can geek out on the multi-gig connection which by all accounts won’t do anything but it will be fun to setup..

But I see a lot of little problems from folks here regarding support and the RAX120... Am I making a mistake?




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Re: Upgrade Jitters

in terms of the modem:

1. Make sure all your connections are good. Replace an old/corroded connections. 

2. check your splitters for corrosion/moisture. 

3. When you're hooking up the modem. You can use your status page to check power to snr (signal to noise ratio). 

Here's a good website with some basics on this.

https://pickmymodem.com/signal-levels-docsis-3-03-1-cable-modem/

 

In terms of router. I've used a similar router. I haven't had many issues (the occasional). I currently am using smart connect because my wife prefers one ssid. The only devices I've had issues with were ones running intel chipsets. The latest updates from intel has helped. the other issue tends to be the DFS channels. If you're using the 160Mhz width, it utilizes the dfs channels for 5ghz. Many devices don't support these channels so there tends to be problems. I'd avoid it unless you really need it. 

Not sure how much area you're trying to cover as you don't list it. Routers have kind of hit a max on distance due to broadcast strength limitations.  You can make sure to optimize what you have by centrally locating the router, making sure signals aren't being blocked (concrete, brick, hvac, and foil lined insulation do a great job of this), and making sure your wifi channels have the least interference. You can optimize with a wifi scanner. You can find these free for pc or phones if you look. 

If you have areas that you need better coverage (aka your porch) a extender is an option to boost signal out there. 

 

Most of the problems I've ran into can be easily solved with a little troubleshooting and I've gotten all my devices working with a little playing around. Thats the issue with buying "draft ax" routers. sometimes you have to play a bit when you're on the forefront of technology. 

CM2000-> Arris W31-> GS716v2-> TP-Link M9Plus

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Re: Upgrade Jitters

The best advice I see out there is update all client delivers, if there are connection problems then set the 2.4 to a width of 20 and set the 5ghz to 80 to help ensure backwards compatibility. Also, don’t enable Smart Connections, leave the networks on separate SSIDs and disable auto-update until you know a firmware version is stable. Anymore tips?
Message 2 of 3
Highlighted
Guru

Re: Upgrade Jitters

in terms of the modem:

1. Make sure all your connections are good. Replace an old/corroded connections. 

2. check your splitters for corrosion/moisture. 

3. When you're hooking up the modem. You can use your status page to check power to snr (signal to noise ratio). 

Here's a good website with some basics on this.

https://pickmymodem.com/signal-levels-docsis-3-03-1-cable-modem/

 

In terms of router. I've used a similar router. I haven't had many issues (the occasional). I currently am using smart connect because my wife prefers one ssid. The only devices I've had issues with were ones running intel chipsets. The latest updates from intel has helped. the other issue tends to be the DFS channels. If you're using the 160Mhz width, it utilizes the dfs channels for 5ghz. Many devices don't support these channels so there tends to be problems. I'd avoid it unless you really need it. 

Not sure how much area you're trying to cover as you don't list it. Routers have kind of hit a max on distance due to broadcast strength limitations.  You can make sure to optimize what you have by centrally locating the router, making sure signals aren't being blocked (concrete, brick, hvac, and foil lined insulation do a great job of this), and making sure your wifi channels have the least interference. You can optimize with a wifi scanner. You can find these free for pc or phones if you look. 

If you have areas that you need better coverage (aka your porch) a extender is an option to boost signal out there. 

 

Most of the problems I've ran into can be easily solved with a little troubleshooting and I've gotten all my devices working with a little playing around. Thats the issue with buying "draft ax" routers. sometimes you have to play a bit when you're on the forefront of technology. 

CM2000-> Arris W31-> GS716v2-> TP-Link M9Plus

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