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R9000 fiber optic connection

ouadasa
Tutor

R9000 fiber optic connection

Hello

i have a fiber optic subscription , what is the best ( and cheapest ) way to connect my R9000. 

Thanks 

Message 1 of 7

Re: R9000 fiber optic connection


@ouadasa wrote:

 

i have a fiber optic subscription , what is the best ( and cheapest ) way to connect my R9000. 

 


The router will connect to just about anything that works with your Internet service provider (ISP).

 

The "fiber" word tells us nothing. Every Internet service has optical fibre in it somewhere. The question is how near it gets to you? Front door? Cabinet up the road?

 

You should ask your unnamed ISP which modems/gateway/ONTs work on its system.

 

You could also talk to other people who use the system for their advice.

 

Netgear does not make ONTs and has given up on modems that work on DSL services.

 

 

Message 2 of 7
ouadasa
Tutor

Re: R9000 fiber optic connection

Sorry if i expressed myself incorrectly  , wanted to know how i physically connect my R9000 . Through a converter ( optical to RJ45 ) or through SFP . Thanks again.

Cordialy

Message 3 of 7
FURRYe38
Guru

Re: R9000 fiber optic connection

Yes you can via ethernet. Also could connect it to the routers SPF port if you got a converter if the Fiber device has a higher connection rated feed. https://community.netgear.com/t5/Nighthawk-Wi-Fi-5-AC-Routers/R9000-Nighthawk-X10-Router-SFP-interne...

Message 4 of 7

Re: R9000 fiber optic connection


@ouadasa wrote:

Sorry if i expressed myself incorrectly  , wanted to know how i physically connect my R9000 . Through a converter ( optical to RJ45 ) or through SFP . Thanks again.

 


If the Internet connection has an RJ45 (LAN) output, just plug that into the WAN port on the router. That's the easiest option.

 

I bet you have a cable lying around somewhere. Most of us acquire dozens of these things over the years.

 

Some people will advise using cables with their idea of "go fast" stripes on the side. Just use what you have got until you find that you need something special. Most people don't.

 

 

Message 5 of 7
Kitsap
Master

Re: R9000 fiber optic connection


@ouadasa wrote:

Sorry if i expressed myself incorrectly  , wanted to know how i physically connect my R9000 . Through a converter ( optical to RJ45 ) or through SFP . Thanks again.

Cordialy


Depends on what level of throughput you are receiving from your optical network converter.  On your R9000, the RJ45 Ethernet input is limited to 1 Gbps.  If you have more than 1 Gbps coming out of your ONT, the SFP converter @FURRYe38 mentioned is a good idea.  Be sure and get a higher rated and shielded Ethernet cable like a Cat 6A to use with the converter.

 

Does your ONT have an optical output like the SFP?

 

 

 

Message 6 of 7
schumaku
Guru

Re: R9000 fiber optic connection

In case you really intend to bring the fiber direct connected to an optical SFP or SFP+ module, first thing you need to know (and understand) the essential differences and limitations between the common transparent optical transport of IP over a fiber (transparent) vs. the more and more deployed GPON (EPON, ..). While a direct fiber connection is a dedicated bi-directional fiber from your is an AON (Active Optical Network), while GPON (Gigabit Passive Optical Network) and EPON (Ethernet over Optical Network) are Passive Optical Networks carrying data on a shared media (yeah).

 

Different from AON networks, PON (Passive Optical Network) is a point to multipoint network structure in which passive optical splitters are used to separate and collect optical signals. The fiber optic splitters allow the PON network to serve multiple subscribers in a single optical fiber without the need to deploy individual fibers between the hub and the end-users. As its name says, the PON network does not include electrically powered switching equipment and shares fiber optic strands for portions of the network. Powered equipment is required only at the source and receiving ends of the signal.

 

The point is that generic computer networking components (like the R9000) can't deal with PON - which does require some intelligence for differentiating the shared traffic. The PON-CPE does not only deal with different colors (wavelength), but also with an encryption ensuring you only see your own network traffic. This requires the PON-CPE to be workable (and supported) by your fiber operator.

 

And we have not talked about the multiple VLANs these optical IP links are bringing to your home - common are VLANs for Internet, IPTV, and telephony.

 

Last: Think again! Modern fiber services are fast, much faster than what the R9000 can handle. We talk of speeds of up to 10 Gbit/s (yes, the R9000 has a 10G capable SFP+ port), this includes the LAN side. Carrier supplied CPEs have at least one or some MultiGig ports, if not at least two 10 Gb port (for LAN and WAN), and are coming with blazing fast WiFi 6 (easily exceeding the capability of these 1 GbE ports on the R9000) and soon WiFi 7. 

 

Typically, you must use the carrier provided equipment to have everything working at the best performance.

 

Unless your unknown fiber service is a little bit de-keyed and explained - I'm not able to answer your question. The minimum you have to tell us is the location, the name of the intended (fiber, Internet, TV, VOIP; ....) service provider, ideally the technology deployed. 

 

Said this: Yes, the R9000 is an amazing piece of kit, and was absolutely leading edge at it's time. Still own one, and operate it, including it's crazy 60 GHz 802.11ad WiFi.

 

 

 

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