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Adding an access point hoses my wireless printing (among other things)

My wireless printing, and everything else, works fine as long as only the R7900 is in operation (the router). However, when I add an R6700 as an access point, it seems to result in two separate networks ... some with IP addresses in the 192 range, and others in the 10 range. For example, before adding the AP, my printer IP was 192.168.1.215, and all my devices can connect and print. When I added the access point, the printer's IP address became 10.0.0.39, and some of my devices could find it while others cannot. What's going on?

Another symptom - when I attempt to connect to the router from my laptop using routerlogin.net to see the attached devices, I get a message that I am not connected to the network. Of course, I would not be able to post this unless I was connected to the network.

 

Main question - why does addition of the access point result in ips in the 10.x.x.x range to appear? When I run ipconfig from my laptop, I am on 192.x.x.x. But my printer, and I guess my router, is on 10.x.x.x. Can I "force" everything to be on 192.x.x.x?

Model: R7900P|Nighthawk X6S AC3000 Tri Band WiFi Router
Message 1 of 8

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Highlighted
Sage

Re: Adding an access point hoses my wireless printing (among other things)

> [...] The R6700 (Firmware version V1.0.2.6_10.0.52) configured as an
> AP shows up as attached to my router at 10.0.0.4. [...]

 

   "shows up" where?  At what, exactly, are you looking?

 

> [...] one of my laptops (but not the other one, which has a 192.x.x.x
> ip for some reason I am trying to discern. [...]

 

   That's the first mystery to solve.  Another (less easy) explanation
of the R6700-as-WAP not having the expected IP address would be the
presence of yet another router (DHCP server).  If you have a one-router
configuration (plus any number of WAPs), then everyone should be on one
big LAN subnet, not some devices on "192.168.1.*", and others on
"10.0.0.*".


   Your reported symptoms are confusing to at least one of us.  I'd
start with a simpler subset, like, say, your (unspecified)
modem, the R7900, and a computer, verify that that works.  Observe the
IP addresses of the WAN/Internet and LAN interfaces of the R7900, and
the address of the computer.  Presumably, the R7900 WAN/Internet address
would be your public address, and its LAN address would be
"192.168.1.1".  You probably shouldn't publish your (whole) public IP
address, but you could report at least the first two octets of anything
("a.b" out of "a.b.c.d").


   If the R7900 LAN address is "10.0.0.1", not "192.168.1.1", then that
would suggest that your (unspecified) modem is a modem+router, not a
simple modem, and the R7900 WAN/Internet address would be some
"192.168.1.X" address, obtained from your not-really-a-modem.  In which
case, you might want to configure your (unspecified) modem+router as a
modem-only, or else configure your R7900 as a WAP, too.


   In any case, reporting the WAN and LAN IP addresses of each router,
and the LAN address of each WAP, would be helpful.

 

   If such a simple network behaves as expected, then you should be able
to add the R6700-as-WAP, and it, too, should have a LAN IP address in
the "192.168.1.*" range.  If that fails, then I'd start looking at
different firmware for the R6700.

 

> [...] I followed those instructions exactly, [...]


   Which instructions are "those instructions"?  As usual, showing
actual actions with their actual results (commands, error messages, LED
indicators, ...) can be more helpful than vague descriptions or
interpretations.

 

   When you configure the R6700 as a WAP, are you choosing "Get
dynamically from existing router", or "Use fixed IP Address (not
recommended)"?  If the default ("Get dynamically [...]"), and the R7900
is the only DHCP server on your LAN, then the R6700-as-WAP should be
doomed to getting a LAN IP address in the "192.168.1.*" range, and
"10.0.0.X" should not appear anywhere.

 

   If that much works, then it would make sense to start adding devices
(and complexity) to your LAN, and see what goes wrong when you do what.

View solution in original post

Message 6 of 8

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Highlighted
Guru

Re: Adding an access point hoses my wireless printing (among other things)


@GGB3LAW wrote:

My wireless printing, and everything else, works fine as long as only the R7900 is in operation (the router). However, when I add an R6700 as an access point, it seems to result in two separate networks ... some with IP addresses in the 192 range, and others in the 10 range.


By rule of thumb, this R6700 is not configured as an Access Point, much more as a NAT router. 

 

FMI: How do I change my Nighthawk router to AP mode after I’ve already run setup? This will allow to have a single flat L2 network then.

Message 2 of 8
Sage

Re: Adding an access point hoses my wireless printing (among other things)

> [...] when I add an R6700 as an access point, it seems to result in
> two separate networks [...]

 

   The easy explanation for that is that you didn't configure the R6700
"as an access point".

 

   What, exactly, did you do?  "configure [...] as an access point" is
not an elementary operation.  As usual, showing actual actions with
their actual results (commands, error messages, LED indicators, ...) can
be more helpful than vague descriptions or interpretations.

 

   "R6700"?  "R6700v2"?  "R6700v3"?  Firmware version?

 

   Visit http://netgear.com/support , put in your (actual) model number,
and look for Documentation.  Get the User Manual.  Look for something
like "Use the Router as a Wireless Access Point".

 

> [...] why does addition of the access point result in ips in the
> 10.x.x.x range to appear? [...]

 

   The addition of a _router_ can do that.  The addition of a wireless
access point would not do that.

 

> [...] Can I "force" everything to be on 192.x.x.x?

 

   Sure.  Configure the R6700[vX] as a wireless access point.

Message 3 of 8
Highlighted
Aspirant

Re: Adding an access point hoses my wireless printing (among other things)

>The easy explanation for that is that you didn't configure the R6700 "as an access point".

 

Easy if that were true, but it is not. The R6700 (Firmware version V1.0.2.6_10.0.52) configured as an AP shows up as attached to my router at 10.0.0.4. I can see my printer from there too, at 10.0.0.39. And I see one of my laptops (but not the other one, which has a 192.x.x.x ip for some reason I am trying to discern. Alas I digress. I connect to 10.0.0.4 - the R6700. I click on Advanced. I note immediately in the Router Information window that operation mode is AP.

 

Originally, I went to Advanced setup>Router/AP/Bridge/Repeating Mode and Selected AP mode. When I go there now, it is still in AP mode so I shan't make any changes. So, I would think that the R6700 is indeed acting as an Access Point.

 

So what I am trying to figure out is why some of my devices connect as 192.168.x.x? When they are connected as such, they can't seem to see or use the printer. Or connect to the router. But, they connect to the internet just fine and dandy. I hate to think the only solution is to disconnect the R6700 and toss it in the bin, but to date the only way I've been able to get everything on the "same"  network seems to be to run only off the R7900 (the one "router" that I think is operating as a "router" in my home.

Model: R6700|Nighthawk AC1750 Smart WiFi Router
Message 4 of 8
Highlighted
Aspirant

Re: Adding an access point hoses my wireless printing (among other things)

Thanks. I followed those instructions exactly, three times. When I connect back to the device, the "Router Information" dialog reports that the operation mode is AP. Yet I still have a few devices that are connected to 192.x.x.x (the "router" and "access point" and printer are on 10.x.x.x) and can't ping the printer. But interestingly, can still connect to the outside internet.

Model: R6700|Nighthawk AC1750 Smart WiFi Router
Message 5 of 8
Highlighted
Sage

Re: Adding an access point hoses my wireless printing (among other things)

> [...] The R6700 (Firmware version V1.0.2.6_10.0.52) configured as an
> AP shows up as attached to my router at 10.0.0.4. [...]

 

   "shows up" where?  At what, exactly, are you looking?

 

> [...] one of my laptops (but not the other one, which has a 192.x.x.x
> ip for some reason I am trying to discern. [...]

 

   That's the first mystery to solve.  Another (less easy) explanation
of the R6700-as-WAP not having the expected IP address would be the
presence of yet another router (DHCP server).  If you have a one-router
configuration (plus any number of WAPs), then everyone should be on one
big LAN subnet, not some devices on "192.168.1.*", and others on
"10.0.0.*".


   Your reported symptoms are confusing to at least one of us.  I'd
start with a simpler subset, like, say, your (unspecified)
modem, the R7900, and a computer, verify that that works.  Observe the
IP addresses of the WAN/Internet and LAN interfaces of the R7900, and
the address of the computer.  Presumably, the R7900 WAN/Internet address
would be your public address, and its LAN address would be
"192.168.1.1".  You probably shouldn't publish your (whole) public IP
address, but you could report at least the first two octets of anything
("a.b" out of "a.b.c.d").


   If the R7900 LAN address is "10.0.0.1", not "192.168.1.1", then that
would suggest that your (unspecified) modem is a modem+router, not a
simple modem, and the R7900 WAN/Internet address would be some
"192.168.1.X" address, obtained from your not-really-a-modem.  In which
case, you might want to configure your (unspecified) modem+router as a
modem-only, or else configure your R7900 as a WAP, too.


   In any case, reporting the WAN and LAN IP addresses of each router,
and the LAN address of each WAP, would be helpful.

 

   If such a simple network behaves as expected, then you should be able
to add the R6700-as-WAP, and it, too, should have a LAN IP address in
the "192.168.1.*" range.  If that fails, then I'd start looking at
different firmware for the R6700.

 

> [...] I followed those instructions exactly, [...]


   Which instructions are "those instructions"?  As usual, showing
actual actions with their actual results (commands, error messages, LED
indicators, ...) can be more helpful than vague descriptions or
interpretations.

 

   When you configure the R6700 as a WAP, are you choosing "Get
dynamically from existing router", or "Use fixed IP Address (not
recommended)"?  If the default ("Get dynamically [...]"), and the R7900
is the only DHCP server on your LAN, then the R6700-as-WAP should be
doomed to getting a LAN IP address in the "192.168.1.*" range, and
"10.0.0.X" should not appear anywhere.

 

   If that much works, then it would make sense to start adding devices
(and complexity) to your LAN, and see what goes wrong when you do what.

View solution in original post

Message 6 of 8
Highlighted
Aspirant

Re: Adding an access point hoses my wireless printing (among other things)

Thank you, sir. Your hunch was correct ... my broadband provider (in an attempt to be helpful) had configured their router to broadcast the same SSID as (what I thought was) my router. So, I did end up with two routers ... the providers, and mine. So, the access point (which was correctly configured to be as AP) was a red herring. Once I removed my router from the equation, everything was copacetic. The AP works great. Everything is on one net and is happy. Thanks SO much for the point in the right direction! 

Model: R6700|Nighthawk AC1750 Smart WiFi Router
Message 7 of 8
Highlighted
Sage

Re: Adding an access point hoses my wireless printing (among other things)

> [...] my broadband provider (in an attempt to be helpful) [...]

Thust no one, I always say.


> [...] had configured their router to broadcast the same SSID as (what
> I thought was) my router. So, I did end up with two routers [...]

 

   It's pretty common for people to think that "wireless" and "router"
are tied together more closely than they are.  The usual problem is
believing that disabling wireless functionality means disabling router
functionality.  Your case is a little more exotic, but the key is a
cpmplete equipment inventory, with an accurate description of the
connections and device configurations.

 

   Glad to hear that you got it under control.

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