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Can I disable 802.11b in R7000P?

I discovered today that my router is advertising availability to the old 802.11b wifi version/protocol, which I've alway understood would lower the performance of the more recent wifi versions/protocols if it were enabled. I can not find a place in the management screens to control which wifi  versions are enabled for my router?

 

If I am mistaken, and leaving 802.11b enabled is OK, that would be good to know as well.

 

Thanks,

 

-Dave

Model: R7000P|Nighthawk AC2300 Smart WiFi Router with MU-MIMO
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Aspirant

This is for an R7000P... thought this forum would post that.

This is for an R7000P... thought this forum would post that.

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Master

Re: This is for an R7000P... thought this forum would post that.

Only time this might come into play is if you had a very old device that only speaks 'b'. As long as no 'b' devices there should not be a problem. 

--Bill
ISP Comcast, Modem-Netgear CM1150V, Router-Unifi Security Gateway-Pro4, AP-2 Unifi AP-LR
Tesla > Edison
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Re: This is for an R7000P... thought this forum would post that.

That was my understanding of 'b' as well, but also knowing how common it is for multiple implementations of protocol negotiation stumble, I would prefer to control the issue, instead of leaving it up to some stupid device and the router to decide for me. I guess I'm used to the open source firmware I was using previously where you can control (sometimes) too much.

 

If one of the many wireless devices in my house somehow negotiated to use 'b' on my router, how would I know? How would I know which device was the troublemaker, even if I did somehow know that the router had fallen back to using 'b'. I know that I have gotten rid of the last 'b'-only device like 3-4 years ago, but that does not mean that I can really be sure that I have left 'b' behind.

 

It just occurred to me that this is a way to hack somebodies wifi network without even having the wifi key. Connect a 'b'-only device, even if you fail to log in, you've probably forced their network to slow down to 'b' until the then next when? Reboot? 24 hours? who knows!

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Re: This is for an R7000P... thought this forum would post that.


@Netmammal wrote:

That was my understanding of 'b' as well, but also knowing how common it is for multiple implementations of protocol negotiation stumble, I would prefer to control the issue, instead of leaving it up to some stupid device and the router to decide for me. I guess I'm used to the open source firmware I was using previously where you can control (sometimes) too much.

 

If one of the many wireless devices in my house somehow negotiated to use 'b' on my router, how would I know? How would I know which device was the troublemaker, even if I did somehow know that the router had fallen back to using 'b'. I know that I have gotten rid of the last 'b'-only device like 3-4 years ago, but that does not mean that I can really be sure that I have left 'b' behind.

 

It just occurred to me that this is a way to hack somebodies wifi network without even having the wifi key. Connect a 'b'-only device, even if you fail to log in, you've probably forced their network to slow down to 'b' until the then next when? Reboot? 24 hours? who knows!


Some of the newer routers seem to be able to sort things out and not penalize the rest of the connections. Back when G first came out, yes a B device would cause the whole connection to drop back. 

--Bill
ISP Comcast, Modem-Netgear CM1150V, Router-Unifi Security Gateway-Pro4, AP-2 Unifi AP-LR
Tesla > Edison
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