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Aspirant

Can I use my EU nighthawk in the USA

Hello,

I own a nighthawk wifi router, bought in the Netherlands. 

Since I will be moving to the USA I was wondering whether the router will operate properly in the USA because of the power grid (220V in the Netherlands opposed to 110V in the USA)?

 

I can't find the voltage requirements on the router. 

 

Thanks for the help!

 

 

Model: R7000|Nighthawk AC1900 Dual Band WiFi Router
Message 1 of 12
Highlighted
Sage

Re: Can I use my EU nighthawk in the USA

> I can't find the voltage requirements on the router.

   The power specification on the router is probably something like
"12VDC 3.5A".  For AC power, what you need to worry about is the "INPUT"
rating of the AC adapter, not the DC rating on the router.  Nowadays,
it's common to find an input voltage range of 100-240VAC, in which case,
all you'd need to worry about would be the connector.

   Other than power, the wireless radio would need to be set to the new
region, perhaps some path like: BASIC > Wireless : Region.  Does your
firmware offer a choice there?

Message 2 of 12
Highlighted
Luminary

Re: Can I use my EU nighthawk in the USA

you're not going to have any problem using your nighthawk in the US. North America voltage is 110V, europe uses a higher voltage of 220-240V so you should be fine

Message 3 of 12
Highlighted
Sage

Re: Can I use my EU nighthawk in the USA

> you're not going to have any problem using your nighthawk in the US.

   Pretty broad claim.

> North America voltage is 110V, europe uses a higher voltage of
> 220-240V so you should be fine

   Actually, it's more like 117V-120V, but whether "you should be fine"
depends on the AC adapter, and what it accepts as input.

   Also, the wireless radio regulations differ around the world, so the
power supply is not the only consideration.

Message 4 of 12
Highlighted
Luminary

Re: Can I use my EU nighthawk in the USA


@antinode wrote:

 Actually, it's more like 117V-120V, but whether "you should be fine"
depends on the AC adapter, and what it accepts as input.

   Also, the wireless radio regulations differ around the world, so the
power supply is not the only consideration.


i take it you're just being cheeky with your post?

 

Any AC adapter than works with the more widely used 220-240V are usually rated to work with the lower '117-120V' of North America

 

the wireless radio regulation for most countries in Europe who are developed/care enough to actually specify wireless radio regulations for their country are mostly compatible with the US regulation and vice versa without violating any safety and security regulations

Message 5 of 12
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Re: Can I use my EU nighthawk in the USA


@Adewale wrote:
i take it you're just being cheeky with your post?

That's a generous interpretation.

 

Plugging a 240 volt transformer into a 120 volt socket does not guarantee that you will get the right volts and amps out of the other end. It depends on the design of the transformer. You could end up with half the volts you need.

 

For some reason, Netgear does not explain that it designs transformers for "dual standard" use. If you consult the manuals, they are not clear,  referring to the adapter in ways that suggests that you will get a different adapter in each region.

 

In reality, past conversations here have shown that Netgear does indeed ship dual-voltage transformers. So, as you say:

 

Any AC adapter than works with the more widely used 220-240V are usually rated to work with the lower '117-120V' of North America

Netgear would be nuts to design two sets of transformers.

 

The good news is that if by a fluke you have an adapter that is single voltage, plugging a 240 volt adapter into 120 volts is less likely to cause damage that doing it the other way round, plug a 120 volt adapter into a 240 volt socket.

 

Just another user.

My network DM200 -> R7800 -> GS316 -> PL1000 -> Orbi RBR40 -> Orbi RBS50Y -> RBS40V
Message 6 of 12
Highlighted
Aspirant

Re: Can I use my EU nighthawk in the USA

Thanks for the reponses!

I indeed found the label on the adapter which states 110V-220V. 

 

Message 7 of 12
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Re: Can I use my EU nighthawk in the USA


@Russellsch wrote:

 

I indeed found the label on the adapter which states 110V-220V. 

 


That's good. Maybe Netgear has mended its ways and started putting that information on transformers. It isn't there on some old ones that I have lying around.

Just another user.

My network DM200 -> R7800 -> GS316 -> PL1000 -> Orbi RBR40 -> Orbi RBS50Y -> RBS40V
Message 8 of 12
Highlighted
Sage

Re: Can I use my EU nighthawk in the USA

> i take it you're just being cheeky with your post?

   I didn't think that "cheeky" was a synonym for "not sloppy", but I
could be wrong.

   Which of the following pieces of advice seems wiser to you?

      1. I've never seen your AC adapter, but you're not going to have
      any problem.

      2. I've never seen your AC adapter, but the ratings on its label
      should tell you whether it will work.


> [...] mostly compatible [...]

   That's reassuring.

> [...] without violating any safety and security regulations

   My concern was not about "safety and security regulations", rather
about which frequencies are legally available for this purpose.

Consider, for example:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_WLAN_channels

and note the difference between the frequency charts for "Most
countries" and "United States".  Or, in the table below the charts,
where channels 12 and 13  differ between "North America" and "Most of
World".

   I assume that such differences are the reason for a setting under
BASIC > Wireless : Region, as cited above.  The firmware on my D7000
leaves the "Region" setting grayed out.  Again, I can't see what's
available on the questioner's router, so I decline to claim that nothing
could possibly go wrong in this context, either.  For a related
discussion:

      https://community.netgear.com/t5/x/x/td-p/507639

 


> Netgear would be nuts to design two sets of transformers.

   Netgear might be nuts to design any AC adapters.  I assume that it
buys theirs from other manufacturers.


> I indeed found the label on the adapter which states 110V-220V.

   220V?  I'd've expected 240V.  But you can see it better from there
than I can from here.

Message 9 of 12
Highlighted
Luminary

Re: Can I use my EU nighthawk in the USA

Maybe you should take the time to get your hands on his type of adapter and see for yourself what's written on it. i have seen his type of adapter and i have traveled between both continents and used adapters designed for both, so i know beyond theoretical scribes in your textbooks what works and how it works. neither of your 'wise' quotes apply to me...


@antinode wrote:

> I didn't think that "cheeky" was a synonym for "not sloppy", but I
could be wrong.

   Which of the following pieces of advice seems wiser to you?

      1. I've never seen your AC adapter, but you're not going to have
      any problem.

      2. I've never seen your AC adapter, but the ratings on its label
      should tell you whether it will work.

 

   My concern was not about "safety and security regulations", rather
about which frequencies are legally available for this purpose.

Consider, for example:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_WLAN_channels

and note the difference between the frequency charts for "Most
countries" and "United States".  Or, in the table below the charts,
where channels 12 and 13  differ between "North America" and "Most of
World".

   I assume that such differences are the reason for a setting under
BASIC > Wireless : Region, as cited above.  The firmware on my D7000
leaves the "Region" setting grayed out.  Again, I can't see what's
available on the questioner's router, so I decline to claim that nothing
could possibly go wrong in this context, either.  For a related
discussion:

      https://community.netgear.com/t5/x/x/td-p/507639

 

beyond reading up on the internet, take the time to get your hands on gadgets beyond whats designed for your north america and actually experiences what all the theories mean and try not to answer questions you have not experienced the possible solutions

 

Message 10 of 12
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Prodigy

Re: Can I use my EU nighthawk in the USA

Pretty much every Netgear router I’ve used since the WNDR3800 era has an EU/NA voltage compatible adapter. It will be written on the adapter itself what it supports, if you want to be sure. I brought my WNDR3800 from the states to India when I was there for a while so this is from experience plus as I said read the adapter info. Most electronics these days have pan region adapters.
Message 11 of 12
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Re: Can I use my EU nighthawk in the USA


@avtella wrote:
Pretty much every Netgear router I’ve used since the WNDR3800 era has an EU/NA voltage compatible adapter. It will be written on the adapter itself what it supports, if you want to be sure.

 


You are probably correct for new kit, as the person who asked the question confirms. But I have just looked at a few older adapters. (I am thinking of setting up a museum of Netgear stuff going back 20 years or so.) None of them says that. Just 240 volts. (I'm not going to unplug the current modem/router to check that!)

 

Fortunately, others have reported that their "240 volt" adapters work in the USA, and vice versa.This question is a common thread around here.

 

These days it is probably hard to find a manufacturer to produce single-voltage transformers. After all, even though Netgear will design the adapters, it does like to make these things look good, the guts  will be standard Chinese circuitry that can switch voltages seamlessly.

 

 

Just another user.

My network DM200 -> R7800 -> GS316 -> PL1000 -> Orbi RBR40 -> Orbi RBS50Y -> RBS40V
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