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Aspirant

Extended Channels

I'm comparing the X10 and the xr500. Due to close proximity of neighbors I need a router with extended DFS channels. I know that the xr500 has them. Does the X10 have that option as well?
Model: R9000|Nighthawk X10 AD7200 Smart WiFi Router
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Apprentice

Re: Extended Channels

I'm in Arizona and my X10 has the DFS channels. It didn't originally but a firmware about 6 months ago enabled them. It is nice. I'm using channel 52 all by myself!

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Guru

Re: Extended Channels

Availability can vary depending on the wireless legislation (for any router). The X10 here on 1.0.4.3RC2 does offer these channels if configured to Europe/Switzerland:

5G Channels Europe-Switzerland X10 1.0.4.3RC2.PNG

 

 

 

 

Message 2 of 11
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Aspirant

Re: Extended Channels

Makes sense, where do I look this up for the United States?
Model: R9000|Nighthawk X10 AD7200 Smart WiFi Router
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Apprentice

Re: Extended Channels

I'm in Arizona and my X10 has the DFS channels. It didn't originally but a firmware about 6 months ago enabled them. It is nice. I'm using channel 52 all by myself!

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Message 4 of 11
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Master

Re: Extended Channels

DFS channels will work nice with a big if. Does the router really support DFS? If so then the DFS channels will work like anyother unless something as simple as a microwave makes the router think it is seeing "radar" interference and will shutdown the 5 gig channel for several minutes and then switch to a new channel. I use a non DFS channel myself, 149, and have no issues. 

--Bill
ISP Comcast, Modem-Netgear CM1150V, Router-Unifi Security Gateway-Pro4, AP-2 Unifi AP-LR
Tesla > Edison
Message 5 of 11
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Aspirant

Re: Extended Channels

Great, thank you!
Message 6 of 11
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Guru

Re: Extended Channels

@myersw Bill, in case a microwave (oven) - consumer devices on about 2.45 GHz, in some legislations there are devices around 915 MHz when I have it right - does create noise up in the 5 GHz band, I would be concerned that something is badly wrong with the device, and it should no longer be operated.

The types of signals a 5 GHz radio has to detect to force a DFS change are well defined, it's much more than some random spikes. 

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Master

Re: Extended Channels


@schumaku wrote:

@myersw Bill, in case a microwave (oven) - consumer devices on about 2.45 GHz, in some legislations there are devices around 915 MHz when I have it right - does create noise up in the 5 GHz band, I would be concerned that something is badly wrong with the device, and it should no longer be operated.

The types of signals a 5 GHz radio has to detect to force a DFS change are well defined, it's much more than some random spikes. 


@schumaku

The types of signals a 5 GHz radio has to detect to force a DFS change are well defined, it's much more than some random spikes. Well defined, true. However company I worked for had large wireless deployment using Cisco equipment. Had one location where when the microwave was used it would knock down the 5 ghz radio for the defined time then comeback on. So from experience I can tell you a bad microwave can effect the DFS channels. In the management software you could see the wireless drop whenever the microwave was used. 

 

You are right, of course, that the microwave should be taken out of service if releasing radiation, but how many old ones are out there where the shielding is bad, but still work fine? I know of no way to tell unless an expensive tester is available. 

 

--Bill
ISP Comcast, Modem-Netgear CM1150V, Router-Unifi Security Gateway-Pro4, AP-2 Unifi AP-LR
Tesla > Edison
Message 8 of 11
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Luminary

Re: Extended Channels

In a high-density Wi-Fi environment like an apartment complex or a sports stadium, DFS is a great option. If you are in single-family housing, however, I would use a Wi-Fi monitoring program to first look at your 5 GHz RF environment before selecting DFS. The downsides to DFS are reduced power (250 mw vs 1 W, i.e., 6dB) and automatic fall-back to non-DFS channel if the AP senses a radar signal.

Model: R7800|Nighthawk X4S AC2600 WiFi Router
Message 9 of 11
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Apprentice

Re: Extended Channels


@pec967 wrote:

In a high-density Wi-Fi environment like an apartment complex or a sports stadium, DFS is a great option. If you are in single-family housing, however, I would use a Wi-Fi monitoring program to first look at your 5 GHz RF environment before selecting DFS. The downsides to DFS are reduced power (250 mw vs 1 W, i.e., 6dB) and automatic fall-back to non-DFS channel if the AP senses a radar signal.


Are you sure about the power being lower on DFS channels?  I have my laptop sitting in the same place and switched from non-DFS channels such as 36 or 149 back to DFS such as 52 several times and the signal strength I get is exactly the same.  I'm using a Wi-Fi monitoring app called Acrylic Wi-Fi home that shows the dB of the signal I receive and it is the same no matter what 5Ghz channel I use.

 

Message 10 of 11
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Guru

Re: Extended Channels


@pec967 wrote:

In a high-density Wi-Fi environment like an apartment complex or a sports stadium, DFS is a great option.


Aehm, appears you talk of selecting DFS channels vs. non-DFS. Be aware that in many legislation, almost all 5 GHz channels (except of four x 20 MHz) require DFS radar detection - so beyond of the four basic channels (typically hevaily used in dense areas) there is no other choice. But then ... seriously ... not many users operate the 5 GHz APs in the almost direct line of sight to the (slightly more powerful, but not much) radars. And then only one channel is typically affected. It's not that it happens that the DFS mechanism does make the 5 GHz radio a frequency hopper.

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