Reply
Highlighted
Aspirant

R7000 Bricked After Genie Update FW to 1.0.9.34

So - Genie showed a firmware update available, to 1.0.9.34 - I said OK, go to it - and now my $200 freaking dollar router is bricked!  The white power light is on a slow blink, white color.  Manual reset, including pinhole hold for 30 secs, pull power and still hold, plug power and hold longer for 30 secs, does not recover the router.  I cannot express my level of frustration with Netgear over this.  It is out of warranty, of course - and no telephone support.  My wife and I work from home - we need a reliable router.  I've looked at the ghoffman tftp method to redo the firmware, but thus far I cannot get access to the router via cable...I do not get a gateway address, nor router address.

 

Is there any downloadable "debrick" software anywhere?  Its been a while since I've had to follow esoteric commands to get something to work.  I really don't want to go that route. 

 

I mean seriously?  A FACTORY reset button will not reset the router?  Seriously?  That alone should qualify for a replacement...I am at wits end....

Model: R7000|AC1900 Smart WIFI Router
Message 1 of 4
Highlighted
Sage

Re: R7000 Bricked After Genie Update FW to 1.0.9.34

> [...] I've looked at the ghoffman tftp method [...]

   I don't know what that means.  You may know what you're looking at,
but the non-psychics in your audience may not.

> [...] thus far I cannot get access to the router via cable...I do not
> get a gateway address, nor router address.

   I don't know what the difference might be between "a gateway address"
and a "router address", but, if you mean that you don't get a good IP
configuration (IP address, and so on) on your (unspecified)
computer/device, then that's expected behavior, if the firmware is
corrupt.

> [...] Is there any downloadable "debrick" software anywhere? [...]

   There is a TFTP recovery procedure:

      https://community.netgear.com/t5/x/x/m-p/1533866#M87578

Whether that's too "esoteric" for you is not for me to say.  Following
that procedure gets around the lack of a working DHCP server ("I do not
get a gateway address [...]").

> [...] A FACTORY reset button will not reset the router? [...]

   The Reset button tells a working device to restore its
user-adjustable settings to their default values.  It's not intended to
reload the firmware if that should become corrupted.  (There's a TFTP
scheme for that.)

Message 2 of 4
Highlighted
Aspirant

Re: R7000 Bricked After Genie Update FW to 1.0.9.34

Hi Antinode,

 

Thaks for the quick reply.  The "ghoffman tftp method" comes up on a number of searches for this issue, for this router.  It has been used by name, hence my repeating it.  And as you point out it is the method to access the router when regular connectivity isn't occuring.

 

However, it frankly isn't the easiest method for middle age and aging former tech geek guru who is getting well left-behind by advancing technology (and terminology).

 

So please keep that in mind when replying to myself and others - please?  Not sure if you are persnickity, snippity, witty or trying for all three...?

 

My specified items:  R7000, various laptops, tablets, desktops, all at home, router was configured for IP domains 10.0.0.1-X as I once ran a seperate in-house LAN, and placed the router behind a firewall to the main LAN, and also I use power ports for a NAS and other sundries.  I mainly connect to that router wirelessly but when "diving deep" into an issue I always use an ethernet CAT5 cable and either a desktop or laptop.  I would think my connection method when wired should be relatively agnostic to my PC hardware - but you tell me.

 

When I ping the router via a cmd window I don't get a gateway address - and I've not yet read enough to understand a lack of a DHCP server (auto setting a DNS?) that TFTP would get around - can you point me to soemthing I could read to better understand?

 

Meanwhile, I am curious if the TFTP method has been written as a batch or other executable file.  Or perhaps a more advanced piece of software that can anticipate connectivity issues (beyond whatever GENIE or MS does) - I've used a few in the past, but nothing really aimed at defunct router access.

 

Lastly, yes, a "reset" does indeed reset to factory settings (hopefully) - and in some cases, to factory FW as well (at least it used to do so).  FW can be kept on a seperate memory bank, yes?  I mean, if we are going to accept these types of risks (bricking by merely following the manufacturer's proscribed update methods) then wouldn't it make sense to also have a method that most consumers could use to easily get it back to out-of-the-box state?  It really isn't that hard to store a working firmware version for last-resort access and reload....

Message 3 of 4
Highlighted
Sage

Re: R7000 Bricked After Genie Update FW to 1.0.9.34

> [...] The "ghoffman tftp method" comes up on a number of searches
> [...]

   That's swell, but I can't see your search results, either.  If you'd
provide a link to what you're viewing, then I could look at it, too,
with no need to guess about it.  But, I claim, the link I provided
should do the job.

> [...] I would think my connection method when wired should be
> relatively agnostic to my PC hardware - but you tell me.

   About all you need for the recovery procedure is a computer with a
wired connection to the router (LAN Ethernet port).  There's no need for
an actual Internet connection once you've downloaded the firmware kit.
(Visit http://netgear.com/support , put in your model number, and look
for Downloads.  Find the kit(s).  Download the kit(s) you want.  Extract
the firmware image file from the kit.)

> [...] can you point me to soemthing I could read to better understand?

>       https://community.netgear.com/t5/x/x/m-p/1533866#M87578

There's a link in there to a Netgear KB article which describes the
set-up step-by step, and pretty clearly, up to a point.  When it comes
to the actual TFTP program(s), many people claim that the TFTP clients
which are built into Windows and macOS are more reliable than the
"download this tool" stuff recommended in that article.  Instructions
for enabling and using those built-in TFTP clients are in that cited
thread.

   It's not a one-click procedure, but reading and following the
instructions might work.  (And, if not, then you'll need to provide a
better description of what you did, and what happened when you did it,
than "tried TFTP", which is what some folks seem to think constitutes a
useful problem description.)

> Meanwhile, I am curious if the TFTP method has been written as a batch
> or other executable file. [...]

   Not that I know of, mostly because it requires you to change your
network interface configuration (as explained in the KB article), and
you'll probably want to put it back as it was later.  There are too many
variables to be handled reliably by a more automatic tool.

> [...]  It really isn't that hard to store a working firmware version
> for last-resort access and reload....

   Doubling the storage adds cost, and the "working firmware version"
storage could also get corrupted.  The TFTP scheme really can be managed
by many ordinary users (eventually), as a search of these forums should
show.

Message 4 of 4
Top Contributors
Discussion stats
  • 3 replies
  • 603 views
  • 0 kudos
  • 2 in conversation
Announcements