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R8000 wifi signal RF direction

joe_wht
Luminary

R8000 wifi signal RF direction

What's the RF frequency signal direction? Ya know the diagrams with odd shaped circles showing where the signal strengths and weaknesses are.
I'm wondering if my AC3200/ R8000 has greater strength front/ backwards or to the Sides. and OF COURSE I know there's 6 flat antennas that ONLY move up and down.. they don't rotate.
By The Way.. I LOVE LOVE LOVE my R8000.
Message 1 of 8
fordem
Mentor

Re: R8000 wifi signal RF direction

Ever heard of "beam forming"? http://kb.netgear.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/25347/~/what-is-beamforming-and-how-does-my-nighthawk-...

Give a man a fish, feed him for a day
Teach a man to fish, feed him for life.
Message 2 of 8
joe_wht
Luminary

Re: R8000 wifi signal RF direction

Not applicable. That has nothing to do with the question. Regarding how signals are emitted from the antennas.
Message 3 of 8
Mars Mug
Virtuoso

Re: R8000 wifi signal RF direction

Please explain why you believe Fordem's reply is not applicable?

Is this not applicable also, take a look at Figure 1 in particular?

http://www.alloyant.com/Whitepaper_Beamforming_Technology_and_Advantages.html
Message 4 of 8
joe_wht
Luminary

Re: R8000 wifi signal RF direction

I'll try to use plain words..
Beam forming is great. With the 6 antennas the R8k can triangulate where each device is (like gps), it knows what antennas each device uses, it calculates what noise/ interference each antenna & device is dealing with..
THEN.. It reallocated antennas, channels & such to each device dependent on its needs.

THAT has nothing to do with router placement & how these flat shapes antennas transmits signals.
Example the old antique round antennas was fairly 360 signals to a 10 foot ceiling. Multiple antennas would give 2x signal to a 100 degree to 150'sh degree area.
Most flat antennas (like these) normally shoot more signal straight out and degrade on each sides.
Do I'm hopeful that netgrear has a diagram on the gain/loss of signal for the R8k
Message 5 of 8
fordem
Mentor

Re: R8000 wifi signal RF direction

I'm guessing you didn't look at the link that Andy provided before responding - it explains exactly why beamforming makes any discussion on antenna radiation patterns irrelevant. I'm also going to guess that you're not a radio engineer and have limited experience with signal propagation...

Give a man a fish, feed him for a day
Teach a man to fish, feed him for life.
Message 6 of 8
joe_wht
Luminary

Re: R8000 wifi signal RF direction

Finally home from work..
Mars Mug.. I LOVED your link on beamforming !

but I'm still wondering if the flat R8k antennas may have improved performance (over the excellent performance I already get ) if turned.
-- I wish I had something to measure the wifi strength other than cel phone bars.

I see the diagram of the formed beam but I figure someone.. Netgear tech or whoever may know if their antenna works better in one direction than another.
( I figure they created them in the shape for some reason )

SO.. my original question is about the antenna and any benefit of it's signal direction / signal increase if the unit is turned.
Message 7 of 8
Mars Mug
Virtuoso

Re: R8000 wifi signal RF direction

I have no doubt that moving or re-positioning the antennae will affect the overall radiation pattern. Also each individual antenna will have its own specific radiation pattern which for the type of antenna will typically be doughnut shaped in the horizontal plane with the antenna vertical. However since beamforming works by phase shifting the signals (and several other tricks), and the effective radiation pattern is then dependant on client positions and environmental factors such as obstructions, walls and their construction type, then no-one will be able to give you answer that will be true to your location.

You can use software which can take measurements of the signal strength/quality/data throughput at a client PC, but more accurate measurements require software/hardware costing hundreds/thousands of £ / $. Even then you will only get a snapshot of the situation at that time, and radio propagation is subject to so many influencing factors that the results could change dramatically in a short timeframe.

Many people use inSSIDer for measuring signal strength / quality, there are several other options including similar free tools for smartphones (Netgear have one). You could use a laptop to optimise the signal at a particular location by re-positioning the antennae, but I think you might find that process a little tedious / frustrating, and as I say the situation could be quite different the next day.

Now, having said all that I have a three antenna R7000 and the recommendation made by Netgear for the positioning of those antennae is/was to have the centre vertical and the two side antennae at 45 degrees, my guess is that would provide ‘height’ to the radiation field for use in a house with two or more floors, and for single floor use all antennae vertical would be better. I don’t own an R8000, but suggest that the radiation pattern for each individual antenna is likely to be that typical doughnut in a plane perpendicular to the antenna, so for maximum phase coverage you would want all those ‘doughnuts’ to overlap each other. In that case the orientation of the router itself in that overlapped plane should make no difference (unless you do something like turn it on its side).
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