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WLAN Eco Mode?

MatM
Guide

WLAN Eco Mode?

Is it possible to have an WLAN ECO Mode activated? If not is it possible with DD-WRT?
Message 1 of 9
fordem
Mentor

Re: WLAN Eco Mode?

What is a WLAN ECO mode? A quick Google & BING search turned up very little - one post about DECT phones. How do you see it as working?

Give a man a fish, feed him for a day
Teach a man to fish, feed him for life.
Message 2 of 9
MatM
Guide

Re: WLAN Eco Mode?

FRITZ Box has it. It works that if there is no wireless client the wlan send not with 100 % it decreases to xxx %. If a wireless client is on then it starts to send with 100 %. hope you understand - english is not my first language
Message 3 of 9
fordem
Mentor

Re: WLAN Eco Mode?

Given that the maximum transmit power on these devices is in the order of milliwatts (100mW max on the 2.4 GHz band), how much of a reduction in power consumption would you expect to see? Please note that average consumption is on the order of 8~15W so even turning the radio off completely would probably not make much of a dent in power consumption.

Give a man a fish, feed him for a day
Teach a man to fish, feed him for life.
Message 4 of 9
RogerSC
Virtuoso

Re: WLAN Eco Mode?

fordem wrote:

Please note that average consumption is on the order of 8~15W so even turning the radio off completely would probably not make much of a dent in power consumption.


Yes, but add "eco" to anything and it sounds good *smile*.
Message 5 of 9
fordem
Mentor

Re: WLAN Eco Mode?

The other thing that I'm curious about is what happens when the client device is just within range (I was out on the pool deck with a laptop after lunch today). For the sake of discussion, let's say there are no wireless clients associated with the router so it reduces the transmit power to xxx %, and I take my laptop out onto the pool deck and power it on - it looks for the WiFi network and doesn't find it because the transmit power is too low for the signal to reach the pool deck. What happens now?

Give a man a fish, feed him for a day
Teach a man to fish, feed him for life.
Message 6 of 9
Mars Mug
Virtuoso

Re: WLAN Eco Mode?

I’m pretty sure that the transmit power of a router (and maybe clients) is adaptive anyway, so a laptop that might be on the edge of the transmit range if the router is currently in a low power mode, should cause the router to increase its transmit power when the router receives a probe request from the laptop.
Message 7 of 9
fordem
Mentor

Re: WLAN Eco Mode?

I've seen clients that are adaptive (especially on a laptop where battery life IS a finite resource), but, for the sake of discussion, let's go to back to my previous post (#6) where the router is in low power mode, and the signal too weak for the laptop to detect it.

In normal WiFi client operation, the client will periodically scan for available networks and if it detects an SSID beacon matching an existing profile, it will connect to the available networks in the preferred order (if more than one is available), if it doesn't receive the SSID beacon, it will make no attempt to connect - it considers that network as "out of range".

The one exception to this is when/if the network has been configured with SSID broadcast disabled, in which case the client also has to be configured appropriately - the big difference here is that the router does not transmit the beacons, so that the client has to search for it - which it does by periodically sending associate requests looking for that SSID, as long as it is powered on and not associated with that network.

It seems to me that you're trading reduced power consumption on the router for increased power consumption on the mobile device.

Give a man a fish, feed him for a day
Teach a man to fish, feed him for life.
Message 8 of 9
Mars Mug
Virtuoso

Re: WLAN Eco Mode?

I pretty much agree with that, it’s the difference between active and passive probes, passive is just listening (to see what’s out there) and active would be for the situation you describe of ‘hidden’ SSID, but often also applies where the already known SSID is a preferred network and the client may send periodic requests even if the network is out of range.

Regardless, I would say that the power reduction is not really related to energy saving for the router/AP but is more to do with transmit range reduction. For the client device which might be battery powered then the energy saving can be important.
Message 9 of 9
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