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cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000

drfred
Luminary

cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000

I have a big home network, and the Nighthawk kept getting frazzled. So I upped my game and got a Juniper SRX240 router for my home.

 

Now the Juniper router is running great, but I cannot talk to the Netgear router. I did a factory reset om the router, but it keeps giving me the same page that says "

You are not connected to your Router’s WiFi network.

but I am. Any ideas?

Message 1 of 17
IrvSp
Master

Re: cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000

Is the Netgear in Access mode? If so you have to find the IP Address of it and then use that to access it. The Juniper router if using DHCP can change that address sometimes as well, but the access list on it (if it has one should show its IP Address).

Message 2 of 17
drfred
Luminary

Re: cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000

I have no idea what mode it is in because I cannot access it.

 

I did a factory reset, then plugged it into my Juniper router, now it does not seem to have an address.

 

I did nmap the 192.168.1.1-255 space and it is not there.

 

Juniper sees something at 10.0.0.1 but I cannot connect with it.

Message 3 of 17
IrvSp
Master

Re: cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000

The NG Router will switch to another private address (like 10.0.0.1) if the default (usually 192.168.1.1) is already in use. So that 10.0.0.1 is probably it. What are you using to try and access the NG? A browser? Just enter 10.0.0.1 into the URL I think should work? It is quite possible that it is now in ROUTER mode since you RESET it I guess? Does the SSID show up on a wireless device?

Message 4 of 17
drfred
Luminary

Re: cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000

Progress. I finally was able to find it - at 192.168.1.1 - even though it says that it will try to detect if there is another router on the network, it does not do that well. In my mind if it is assigned 192.168.1.1 and scans and finds that there is another router out there at 192.168.1.1, it should either pop up a message and say there is a conflict, and ask what IP do you want, or it should automatically DHCP from the existing router and get a new address. But that doesn't work.

 

So. I reset the IP address of the router manually to 192.168.1.247 and was able to acess it just fine.

 

Now the problem is that I set up everything as far as the WiFi settings how I want them, then go to the advanced settings and try to turn the Nighthawk into a wireless AP and it will not work.

 

The unit starts up and broadcasts an ssid, but I cannot make connections to it. I can see all the different ssids NETGEAR18, NETGEAR18-5G-1, and NETGEAR-5G-2, but all of my devices just sit and spin when trying to connect.

 

I also cannot access it at 192.168.1.247 either through the Juniper router or even direct connect.

 

I suspect that there is something wrong with the wireless AP mode.

Message 5 of 17
drfred
Luminary

Re: cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000

When I look at the detailed wireless settings it appears that the Nighthawk has no IP address. See attached. Could the IP adress be getting deleted when the unit goes into wireless AP mode?

 

 

Message 6 of 17
IrvSp
Master

Re: cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000

Message 7 of 17
drfred
Luminary

Re: cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000

the 192.168.1.37 in the screen shot is the IP address of my machine that is trying to connect to the NETGEAR18 WiFi

 

Thank you for the links but I have already seen those instructions. The manual SAYS that the router will detect an existing router at 192.168.1.1 and switch to 10.0.0.1 automatically, but in reality that is not happening.

 

I see broacast ssids, but cannot access at 192.168.1.247 (which was what I had set it to) or 10.0.0.1

 

I have gone through this routine a number of times and must be missing something. Either that or the thing just doesn't work.

 

 

Message 8 of 17
antinode
Guru

Re: cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000

> [...] Nighthawk [...] Juniper SRX240 [...]

   How, exactly, is this stuff connected and configured?

> [...] I cannot talk to the Netgear router. [...]

   "cannot" is not a useful problem description.  It does not say what
you did.  It does not say what happened when you did it.  As usual,
showing actual actions with their actual results (error messages, LED
indicators, ...) can be more helpful than vague descriptions or
interpretations.

   Presumably, you're using some web browser or other, on some computer
or other, running some OS or other, connected somehow or other, to one
of these routers or the other, and you specified some URL or other.
None of which is obvious from your non-description.

> [...] You are not connected to your Router's WiFi network. [...]

   That suggests that you might be specifying some URL like
"http://routerlogin.net".  If so, then welcome to what may be the worst
error message in the world.  For an explanation, try:

      https://community.netgear.com/t5/x/x/m-p/1365830

   Briefly, the idea is that "[www.]routerlogin.net" should point to
your own router, but that's true only if you use your own router for DNS
name resolution.  Irregardful, you should be able to get to the thing
using its IP address, if you can determine (or guess) that.  Normally,
that would be something like "192.168.1.1", but it could be different.

   In a configuration with multiple routers, it's easy to be using some
DNS server other than the Netgear router, in which case names like
"[www.]routerlogin.net" will lead you to that (misleading, useless)
error page.


> [...] I suspect that there is something wrong with the wireless AP
> mode.

   Or the way it was configured.  You seem to be doing much mindless
thrashing without a plan.  Some organization might help.

   Are you trying to configure the R8000 as a wireless access point
(with the Juniper SRX240 as the main router)?  Which IP subnet is the
main router using?

Message 9 of 17
drfred
Luminary

Re: cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000

Wow, such anger. I'm really just asking for help. I am just not familiar with the quirks of the Nighthawk in AP mode. Perhaps you are used to dealing with amateurs. I am a professional, and likely was programming machine code while you were in diapers. So let's tone it down, please.

 

I will take your questions one by one.

 


 >>  How, exactly, is this stuff connected and configured?

 

I have a large home network with approximately 120 active devices on the network. These include bitcoin miners, 2 PS4s, 2 Xboxes, at least 8 computers, NAS devices with some 100 TB storage, music equipment, etc. There are TVs, Blu-ray players, Roku, stereo hosting an internet radio. I have a wireless network that runs using several old Netgear routers that have had their firmware rewritten with dd-wrt so they work as access points. Internet comes into the home via cable. There is a cable modem that previously plugged into the Netgear Nighthawk X6 R8000 which was the central router for the whole deal. The problem was that with the 100 TH/sec bitcoin mining setup, plus 4 movies being viewed and two teenagers playing games over the network with a group of friends, the Nighthawk would overheat and need to be reset.

 

So, I changed the setup to a router that could better handle the load - the Juniper SRX240. It is running beautifully. The network is fine, the bitcoin miners run well, the movies play, etc. Now I would like to add back the Nighthawk as a wireless AP. The problem is that every time I get to the step where the router says it is switching into AP mode, it stops behaving normally.


>>   "cannot" is not a useful problem description.  It does not say what
>>you did.  It does not say what happened when you did it.  As usual,
>>showing actual actions with their actual results (error messages, LED
>>indicators, ...) can be more helpful than vague descriptions or
>>interpretations.

>>   Presumably, you're using some web browser or other, on some computer
>>or other, running some OS or other, connected somehow or other, to one
>>of these routers or the other, and you specified some URL or other. 
>>None of which is obvious from your non-description.

 

Fine, I will detail all of the steps that I have taken. I thought that there might be some professionals here who would know what I mean when I say that I cannot connect to the router. Perhaps not.

 

The Nighthawk is now plugged into the Juniper router through its (the Netgear router's) internet port as described by the documentation. Now I am not (yet) a Juniper expert, but I can see from the Juniper router that the port is active, and it seems to see a device at 10.0.0.1

 

I have tried accessing the NH through the network at 10.0.0.1 using a MacBook pro with Chrome, Firefox, and Safari. I have reset all browser caches. I have tried accessing through the network using an iMac with Chrome and Safari. I have tried accessing the router with a Windows 10 laptop using Chrome, Firefox, Edge, and Internet Explorer.

 

I have done all of the above using www.routerlogin.net and 192.168.1.247 (which was the IP of the router before switching into AP mode) as well. None of these connection methods was successful.

 

The device is broadcasting NETGEAR18, NETGEAR18-5G-1 and NETGEAR18-5G-2. I have attempted to connect to these with multiple machines with no luck. The WiFi access just spins and eventually times out.

 

So it appears that the Nighthawk is not working properly as a wireless AP. But since I am not an expert on the Nighthawk, I came here to ask, what am I missing?

 

 

 
Message 10 of 17
antinode
Guru

Re: cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000

> Wow, such anger. [...]

   Anger?  No.  Mystification, perhaps.  Again, you assume too much.

> I will take your questions one by one.

   You missed one.

> [...] several old Netgear routers that have had their firmware
> rewritten with dd-wrt so they work as access points. [...]

   Do they have fixed IP addresses (static or reserved dynamic)?

> [...] every time I get to the step where the router says it is
> switching into AP mode, it stops behaving normally.

   Define "normally".  It certainly should behave differently when
configured as a WAP.

> [...] I thought that there might be some professionals here who would
> know what I mean when I say that I cannot connect to the router. Perhaps
> not.

   There may, be, but I'm not one of them.  Now, does "connect to the
router" mean connect using a web browser (on some system which is
connected to the same LAN) to the R8000 after it's configured as a WAP?
And what URL are you using to do that?  (I'd expect a competent
"professional" to realize that there are other possibilities, such as
file sharing (AFP, SMB, ...), Telnet, FTP, ICMP/"ping" and so on.)

> [...] I can see from the Juniper router that the port is active, and
> it seems to see a device at 10.0.0.1

   What, exactly, does "I can see" or "seems to see" mean in this case?
At what, exactly, are you looking?  That address seems inconsistent with
an R8000 which is configured as a WAP, but that would depend on...

> [...] Which IP subnet is the main router using?

   Still wondering.  If you're configuring a WAP, including an
R8000-as-WAP, then it joins the LAN of the main router.  Hence my
interest in the main-router LAN.  (If you were trying to impress, then
answering that one question would have done more that all that bragging
about your programming experience.  Univac 422, before Ethernet, by the
way.)

> I have tried accessing the NH through the network at 10.0.0.1 using a
> MacBook pro with Chrome, Firefox, and Safari. [...]

   And what is the IP address of that Mac?  When configured as a WAP,
the R8000 should get a LAN address on the same subnet as the rest of the
LAN.  But, with my weak psychic powers, I don't know what that is.

> I have done all of the above using www.routerlogin.net and
> 192.168.1.247 (which was the IP of the router before switching into AP
> mode) as well. None of these connection methods was successful.

   As explained before, "www.routerlogin.net" can be expected to fail
(stupid error page) with a WAP.

   A router does not have one IP address; it has a WAN address and a LAN
address.  Thus, I don't know what "the IP of the router" means.  _Which_
"the IP of the router"?  In any case, If you're configuring a WAP,
including an R8000-as-WAP, then it joins the LAN of the main router.
Hence my (continuing) interest in the main-router LAN.  Whichever
address was "192.168.1.247" when the R8000 was in router mode, it's
unlikely that the R8000 will still have that (LAN) address when it's in
WAP mode.

   In my experience with Netgear routers configured as WAPs, part of
that operation involves a choice between "Get dynamically from existing
router" and "Enable fixed IP settings on this device (not recommended)".
Knowing how you dealt with that would have been interesting.

   If you chose "Get dynamically from existing router", then you may
need to ask the "existing router" (presumably your Juniper SRX240) which
address it (its DHCP server) issued to the R8000-as-WAP.  On a Netgear
router, that datum would typically appear in an "Attached Devices"
report.  In a different router, it might be found in a "DHCP clients"
report.

   If you choose "Enable fixed IP settings on this device (not
recommended)" (which is what I usually recommend), then you need to
specify an address on the main-router LAN which is outside the
main-router DHCP pool.  In that case, you know immediately the LAN
address of the R8000-as-WAP, because you're specifying it yourself.  (On
a Netgear router, the DHCP pool typically includes the whole (available)
subnet, ".2" - ".254".  In such a case, the pool must be shrunk to leave
some non-pool addresses available for such static use.)

   Either way, when you know the LAN address of the R8000-as-WAP, you
should be able to point your web browser at it, and reach the R8000
managment web site.

> So it appears that the Nighthawk is not working properly as a wireless
> AP. [...]

   Or it's not configured properly as a WAP, but, because a WAP is part
of the main-router LAN, without any information on the main-router LAN,
it's tough to determine how the R8000-as-WAP should be configured.

> [...] But since I am not an expert on the Nighthawk, I came here to
> ask, what am I missing?

   Can't tell yet.

Message 11 of 17
drfred
Luminary

Re: cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000

OK, so maybe not so much anger, but the sarcasm meter has blown out. I do greatly appreciate you trying to help me with this problem.

 

>>> [...] several old Netgear routers that have had their firmware
>>> rewritten with dd-wrt so they work as access points. [...]
>>   Do they have fixed IP addresses (static or reserved dynamic)?

 

Their IPs are static.

 

 

 

>>   There may, be, but I'm not one of them.  Now, does "connect to the
>>router" mean connect using a web browser (on some system which is
>>connected to the same LAN) to the R8000 after it's configured as a WAP? 
>>And what URL are you using to do that?  (I'd expect a competent
>>"professional" to realize that there are other possibilities, such as
>>file sharing (AFP, SMB, ...), Telnet, FTP, ICMP/"ping" and so on.)

 

Yes. I thought that I was clear that I was using web browsers to attempt to connect to the R8000. I do also use the terminal and try to ping the device. When I say that it does not connect, it does not connect via http on port 80 or via ping. I can get you the Nmap scan output if you like.

 

 

>>> [...] I can see from the Juniper router that the port is active, and
>>> it seems to see a device at 10.0.0.1
>>   What, exactly, does "I can see" or "seems to see" mean in this case? 
>>At what, exactly, are you looking?  That address seems inconsistent with
>>an R8000 which is configured as a WAP, but that would depend on...

 

The Juniper router has a GUI as well as a CLI. The GUI is called "JWeb". On Jweb there is a "Dashboard" which shows the ports on the device and they are red or green depending on whether they are active ports or not. The port that plugs from the Internet port on the R8000 to the Juniper device shows up as green on the dashboard, so it is active. When I monitor the port it shows a client at 10.0.0.1.

 

However, ping to 10.0.0.1 returns nothing. Attempting to access via web browser at 10.0.0.1 times out. I am not sure of the low level protocols that are being used between the Juniper router and the R8000 that enabled the SRX240 to detect that a client was at 10.0.0.1.


>> [...] Which IP subnet is the main router using?

 

the main router is 192.168.1.1, subnet mask 255.255.255.0

> I have tried accessing the NH through the network at 10.0.0.1 using a
> MacBook pro with Chrome, Firefox, and Safari. [...]

>>   And what is the IP address of that Mac? 

 

It has a static IP address 192.168.1.105 that I assigned. I have also played with trying to let the Mac get an IP assigned through DHCP, but that has not worked.

 

>>When configured as a WAP, the R8000 should get a LAN address on the same subnet as the rest of the
>>LAN.  But, with my weak psychic powers, I don't know what that is.

 

The SHOULD is the key word in your statement. It appears that every time I go through the process of telling the R8000 router to switch to AP mode, it does NOT get an IP on the same subnet.


Now, it may be better to do a complete factory reset and start the process as an AP, instead of starting as a router and switching modes. This seems obvious now,but it is getting late and I am tired. Maybe tomorrow.

Message 12 of 17
drfred
Luminary

Re: cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000

OK, so maybe not so much anger, but the sarcasm meter has blown out. I do greatly appreciate you trying to help me with this problem.

 

>>> [...] several old Netgear routers that have had their firmware
>>> rewritten with dd-wrt so they work as access points. [...]
>>   Do they have fixed IP addresses (static or reserved dynamic)?

 

Their IPs are static.

 

 

 

>>   There may, be, but I'm not one of them.  Now, does "connect to the
>>router" mean connect using a web browser (on some system which is
>>connected to the same LAN) to the R8000 after it's configured as a WAP? 
>>And what URL are you using to do that?  (I'd expect a competent
>>"professional" to realize that there are other possibilities, such as
>>file sharing (AFP, SMB, ...), Telnet, FTP, ICMP/"ping" and so on.)

 

Yes. I thought that I was clear that I was using web browsers to attempt to connect to the R8000. I do also use the terminal and try to ping the device. When I say that it does not connect, it does not connect via http on port 80 or via ping. I can get you the Nmap scan output if you like.

 

 

>>> [...] I can see from the Juniper router that the port is active, and
>>> it seems to see a device at 10.0.0.1
>>   What, exactly, does "I can see" or "seems to see" mean in this case? 
>>At what, exactly, are you looking?  That address seems inconsistent with
>>an R8000 which is configured as a WAP, but that would depend on...

 

The Juniper router has a GUI as well as a CLI. The GUI is called "JWeb". On Jweb there is a "Dashboard" which shows the ports on the device and they are red or green depending on whether they are active ports or not. The port that plugs from the Internet port on the R8000 to the Juniper device shows up as green on the dashboard, so it is active. When I monitor the port it shows a client at 10.0.0.1.

 

However, ping to 10.0.0.1 returns nothing. Attempting to access via web browser at 10.0.0.1 times out. I am not sure of the low level protocols that are being used between the Juniper router and the R8000 that enabled the SRX240 to detect that a client was at 10.0.0.1.


>> [...] Which IP subnet is the main router using?

 

the main router is 192.168.1.1, subnet mask 255.255.255.0

> I have tried accessing the NH through the network at 10.0.0.1 using a
> MacBook pro with Chrome, Firefox, and Safari. [...]

>>   And what is the IP address of that Mac? 

 

It has a static IP address 192.168.1.105 that I assigned. I have also played with trying to let the Mac get an IP assigned through DHCP, but that has not worked.

 

>>When configured as a WAP, the R8000 should get a LAN address on the same subnet as the rest of the
>>LAN.  But, with my weak psychic powers, I don't know what that is.

 

The SHOULD is the key word in your statement. It appears that every time I go through the process of telling the R8000 router to switch to AP mode, it does NOT get an IP on the same subnet.


Now, it may be better to do a complete factory reset and start the process as an AP, instead of starting as a router and switching modes. This seems obvious now,but it is getting late and I am tired. Maybe tomorrow.

 

Thanks again for your input.

Message 13 of 17
antinode
Guru

Re: cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000

> the main router is 192.168.1.1, subnet mask 255.255.255.0

> [The Mac] has a static IP address 192.168.1.105 [...]

   Ok.  Then the R8000-as-WAP must have a LAN IP address on the
"192.168.1.*" subnet.

> [...] it may be better to do a complete factory reset and start the
> process as an AP, instead of starting as a router and switching modes.

   Not possible.  After a settings reset, it will be back in router
mode.  For simplicity, you can leave the R8000 divorced from your main
LAN while you switch it to WAP mode.  Connect a computer (only) to one
of its LAN ports, and use a web browser.  In that arrangement, even
"[www.]routerlogin.net" should work (until the mode change).

    After it's in WAP mode, it'll be pretty much useless until you
connect it (its WAN port) to your main router.  (It'd work as a fancy
network switch with wireless capability, but it'd have no DHCP server,
and no way to contact the outside world.)

> [...] I have also played with trying to let the Mac get an IP assigned
> through DHCP, but that has not worked.

   It should, if the Mac is connected to the R8000-as-router.  (Or if
the Mac is connected to the R8000-as-WAP, and the R8000-as-WAP is
properly configured, and the R8000-as-WAP is connected to the
main-router LAN.)

   If your virgin (or freshly reset/re-virginized) R8000 were awakened
(on its own) as a router, then it would, by default, use "192.168.1.1"
as its own LAN address.  If you connect its WAN interface to a network
which is already using the "192.168.1.*" subnet (like your Juniper
SRX240 LAN), then, to avoid the obvious LAN-WAN conflict, it would
normally switch to using "10.0.0.*" for its LAN instead of
"192.168.1.*".  That may be why you saw some "10.0.0.X" stuff.  But, no
matter what it did when it was a router, in WAP mode, it must join the
LAN of the main router, so it must have a LAN address in the
"192.168.1.*" subnet (like the Juniper SRX240).

> [...] It appears that every time I go through the process of telling
> the R8000 router to switch to AP mode, it does NOT get an IP on the same
> subnet.

   How would you know?  As I said, if you chose "Get dynamically from
existing router", then only your "existing router" would know the new
(DHCP-supplied) LAN address of the R8000-as-WAP.  The alternative,
"Enable fixed IP settings on this device (not recommended)", requires
you to choose a static, non-pool LAN address for the R8000-as-WAP.
Again, I don't know what you did.

> Their IPs are static.

   In that case, I'd probably choose "Enable fixed IP settings on this
device (not recommended [except by me])" for the R8000-as-WAP, too.
Just pick another (currently unused) non-pool address in the
"192.168.1.*" subnet for it.

   What could go wrong?

   One of the keys to WAP configuration is realizing that a WAP is
all-LAN, so it needs to be configured to work on the LAN of the main
router, irregardful of what it might have done in some previous life as
a full-function router.  When you say "Enable Access Point Mode", it
re-configures the WAN port as yet another LAN port (perhaps not exactly
equivalent to the normal LAN ports, but pretty durned close).

   But "all-LAN" means that, one way or another, it must get a new LAN
address which is on the main-router LAN subnet.  You pick it, or the
main-router DHCP server picks it.  One way you know what it is, the
other way you need to hunt for it.


> [...] I thought that I was clear that I was using web browsers to
> attempt to connect to the R8000 [...]

   You might be amazed by the number of "can't see" complaints around
here related to file sharing (which are comparably unclear).

   It's clear as soon as you say "web browser".  (But the URL being
specified may still be a mystery.)  It's all obvious to the fellow who's
doing it, but expecting anyone else to guess/assume these things is just
asking for trouble.  A quick Web search for:
      "Desk Set" "never assume"
could be valuable.  ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pEoFFYH_m0Q )

Message 14 of 17

Re: cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000


@drfred wrote:

OK, so maybe not so much anger, but the sarcasm meter has blown out.

 


Sorry about that. Most people here try to be friendly and helpful and to understand where users are coming from.

 



Now, it may be better to do a complete factory reset and start the process as an AP, instead of starting as a router and switching modes.

 


If you can connect the R8000 to a PC with nothing else connected, then you can get into its browser interface, configure it to AP mode, then restart the whole network with the R8000 connected to your main router.

 

When you are in AP mode, note these limitations:

 

Disabled Features on the Router when set to AP Mode | Answer | NETGEAR Support

 

 

Just another user.

My network DM200 -> R7800 -> GS316 -> PL1000 -> Orbi RBR40 -> Orbi RBS50Y -> RBS40V
Message 15 of 17
drfred
Luminary

Re: cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000

>>> the main router is 192.168.1.1, subnet mask 255.255.255.0
>>> [The Mac] has a static IP address 192.168.1.105 [...]
>>   Ok.  Then the R8000-as-WAP must have a LAN IP address on the
"192.168.1.*" subnet.

 

Yes, you would think. I certainly was thinking that. It just didn't happen.

>>> [...] it may be better to do a complete factory reset and start the
>>> process as an AP, instead of starting as a router and switching modes.
>>   Not possible.  After a settings reset, it will be back in router
>>mode.  For simplicity, you can leave the R8000 divorced from your main
>>LAN while you switch it to WAP mode.  Connect a computer (only) to one
>>of its LAN ports, and use a web browser.  In that arrangement, even 
>>"[www.]routerlogin.net" should work (until the mode change).

 

After the last complete factory reset I did, the unit, plugged by itself into the Ethernet port on one of my laptops, came up with a screen in the Genie asking what mode I would like to set up the device into, router mode or AP mode. I do not recall having seen that screen before, but it was there.

 


>>    After it's in WAP mode, it'll be pretty much useless until you
>>connect it (its WAN port) to your main router.  (It'd work as a fancy
>>network switch with wireless capability, but it'd have no DHCP server,
>>and no way to contact the outside world.)

 

Yes, that is what I see. It does not connect through any of the ports to a laptop directly connected to it. It broadcasts ssids, but will not connect that way, which as you have pointed out is because it is not running DHCP - it would only redirect those connections to the main router.

 

The problem is that once I connect it to the main router, it never gets an IP on the main subdomain. The main router detects a device sitting out there at 10.0.0.1 but apparently never assigns it an IP in the 192.168.1.* subdomain. I have been assuming that this is a problem with the R8000, but with your prodding it does seem that the problem may lie in the Juniper SRX240 main router not assigning an IP to the device. As I am not (yet) a JunOS expert, this may take some time to sort out, but you may have pointed me in the correct direction. The SRX420 does not seem to have any problem with DHCP with any of the other devises I hook up to it, but they are not APs. The other Netgear APs running dd-wrt have fixed IIPs, so they do not need DHCP. I had been hoping that by setting a static IP on the R8000 prior to switching it to AP mode would do the same, but apparently not.

 

>>   If your virgin (or freshly reset/re-virginized) R8000 were awakened
>>(on its own) as a router, then it would, by default, use "192.168.1.1"
>>as its own LAN address.  If you connect its WAN interface to a network
>>which is already using the "192.168.1.*" subnet (like your Juniper
>>SRX240 LAN), then, to avoid the obvious LAN-WAN conflict, it would
>>normally switch to using "10.0.0.*" for its LAN instead of
>>"192.168.1.*".

 

You would think that. I certainly did. But it did not. That is why I could not find the device as router on by subnet, nor at 10.0.0.1. It turned out that even though the R8000 goes through the machinations of "Detecting whether there is an existing router on your network" it did not in fact recognize the SRX240 on the network, adn maintained the 192.168.1.1 IP address. That is the reason I could not "see" it because the SRX240 intercepted all port 80 requests, ping requests, etc. It was only when I disconnected the R8000 and accessed it directly with a laptop that I could see that it was still set to 192.168.1.1.  Again, I have been assuming that this was a problem with the R8000, as other devices run fine on the SRX240 network. However, it could be that the SRX240 is not handliong DHCP correctly when it runs into the R8000, and it is DHCP that the R8000 is using when "Detecting whether there is another router..."

 

>>  That may be why you saw some "10.0.0.X" stuff.  But, no
>>matter what it did when it was a router, in WAP mode, it must join the
>>LAN of the main router, so it must have a LAN address in the
>>"192.168.1.*" subnet (like the Juniper SRX240).
>> [...] It appears that every time I go through the process of telling
>> the R8000 router to switch to AP mode, it does NOT get an IP on the same
>> subnet.
>>   How would you know?  As I said, if you chose "Get dynamically from
>>existing router", then only your "existing router" would know the new
>>(DHCP-supplied) LAN address of the R8000-as-WAP.  The alternative,
>>"Enable fixed IP settings on this device (not recommended)", requires
>>you to choose a static, non-pool LAN address for the R8000-as-WAP. 
>>Again, I don't know what you did.

 

Yes. that is exactly what I tried to do, multiple times. I set a static address on the R8000-as router to 192.168.1.247, then switched to AP mode. At that point the R8000 in reality stopped using the 192.168.1.247 and switched to 10.0.0.1, if what I am seeing on the SRX240 makes sense. At the point the the R8000 switches into AP mode I can no longer connect to it via laptop, so I can't see what it is doing. It is only after I connect it to the main router that I saw the 10.0.0.1, but still could not connect. I now suspect that this is a DCHP problem on the SRX240, but still have no idea how to fix that.


>>   One of the keys to WAP configuration is realizing that a WAP is
>>all-LAN, so it needs to be configured to work on the LAN of the main
>>router, irregardful of what it might have done in some previous life as
>>a full-function router.  When you say "Enable Access Point Mode", it
>>re-configures the WAN port as yet another LAN port (perhaps not exactly
>>equivalent to the normal LAN ports, but pretty durned close).

 

Irregardful is not a word, as irregardless is not either, but point taken.

 

>>   But "all-LAN" means that, one way or another, it must get a new LAN
>>address which is on the main-router LAN subnet.  You pick it, or the
>>main-router DHCP server picks it.  One way you know what it is, the
>>other way you need to hunt for it.

 

I will now hunt down DHCP problems on the SRX240 and see if that solves the problem.

>>   You might be amazed by the number of "can't see" complaints around
>>here related to file sharing (which are comparably unclear).
>>
>>  It's clear as soon as you say "web browser".  (But the URL being
>>specified may still be a mystery.)  It's all obvious to the fellow who's
>>doing it, but expecting anyone else to guess/assume these things is just
>>asking for trouble.

 

Yes I agree. Unfortunately file sharing and file permissions is an area that the various computer OS makers and network makers can never seem to agree on or put software effort into making work correctly. Therefore we are left with a soup of difficult to solve problems. I guess this keeps IT people in jobs. It does make life difficult for us weekend warriors who have more important things to worry about like heart surgery and saving people's lives. But that is your lot in life when you are a genius...oh, and if you get a chance, read my new novel when it comes out. You might like it. (I am entirely serious in this last paragraph if you think I am just blowing smoke. Check me out some time, but then again, you have to figure out who I am first.)

 
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Message 16 of 17
antinode
Guru

Re: cannot login to router Nighthawk X6 r8000

> [...] The main router detects a device sitting out there at 10.0.0.1
> but apparently never assigns it an IP in the 192.168.1.* subdomain.
> [...]

   If true, then either the R8000-as-WAP is not asking for one, or the
main router is not issuing one.  (I'd suspect the former.)

> [...] The SRX420 does not seem to have any problem with DHCP with any
> of the other devises I hook up to it, but they are not APs. [...]

   Shouldn't matter.  For most purposes, a DHCP client is a DHCP client.

> [...] I had been hoping that by setting a static IP on the R8000 prior
> to switching it to AP mode would do the same, but apparently not.

>    A router does not have one IP address; it has a WAN address and a LAN
> address.  Thus, I don't know what "the IP of the router" means.  _Which_
> "the IP of the router"?  [...]

   Still true/mysterious.

   You should not need to set any IP address "on the R8000 prior to
switching it to AP mode".  I don't know what you're doing, but I claim
that you don't need to do it.  If you want to specify a static LAN IP
address for the WAP, then that's what "Enable fixed IP settings on this
device (not recommended)" is for.

> [...] "Detecting whether there is another router..." [...]

   I've never dealt with that automatic scheme.  I'd tend to skip it,
and get on with manual WAP configuration.  But, in any case, I would not
try to set "a static IP on the R8000 prior to switching it to AP mode".

> [...] I set a static address on the R8000-as router to 192.168.1.247,
> then switched to AP mode. [...]

   See above regarding "the" IP address of a router.

> I will now hunt down DHCP problems on the SRX240 and see if that
> solves the problem.

   Seems unlikely, but I'm always open to actual evidence.

   I'd go back to the isolated router+computer configuration, reset the
router, and "Enable Access Point Mode", with "Enable fixed IP settings
on this device (not recommended)", and specify there (not anywhere else)
the desired (LAN) IP address ("192.168.1.247", if that's where you want
it).


> [...] Irregardful is not a word, as irregardless is not either, [...]

   They're antonyms.  One is not a double negative.

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