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using single band antenna on dual band router

RSPal
Follower

using single band antenna on dual band router

I have a Netgear X4S dual band wifi router. I was wondering....if I attach a TP-Link TL-ANT2409A (2.4GHz only) directional antenna to the X4S router....will the router just simply broadcast the 2.4GHz signal thru the antenna? What I am trying to do is strengthen the wifi signal in my garage....which is just far enough away from the router to get almost no signal. My garage is not heated and it can get below freezing in the winter....so I don't want to use a wifi extender and have the cold weather ruin the extender. I would rather just shoot a stronger signal towards the garage with the TP-Link antenna from where the router is located, and keep the antenna indoors and weather-safe. The reason I am looking at the TP-Link TL-ANT2409A is due to the low cost on Amazon ($21).

 

I don't have any experience with the technical aspects of setting up a network....so please don't get too technical if you have any advice. Thanks so much for any assistance you can provide!

Model: R7800|Nighthawk X4S AC2600 Wifi Router
Message 1 of 10
ElaineM
NETGEAR Employee Retired

Re: using single band antenna on dual band router

Welcome to the community, @RSPal

 

We have not tested that kind of setup.

You may give a try and make sure that the connectors fit. 

ElaineM
NETGEAR Community Team
Message 2 of 10
StephenB
Guru

Re: using single band antenna on dual band router

There's more than one connector that antennas use, so you will need to make sure they match.  The TP-link comes with rp-sma or n.  But routers usually use rp-tnc. Here are some pictures: http://wireless.gumph.org/content/3/7/011-cable-connectors.html

 

You can adapt the connectors using a "pigtail" - you'll need to google the combination you need.

 

Some of the antennas in your router are sending 2.4 ghz, others are sending 5 ghz.  You'll need to figure out which one(s) you need to replace, since you do need to connect the tp-link to one of the 2.4 ghz radios.  That might require some trial-and-error.  For instance, remove the two outer antennas and see which band disappears.  That test needs to be done a good distance from the router, because you likely will get some signal if you are close.

 

Usually you'd replace both 2.4 ghz antennas, and not mismatch them.  I don't know what difference that will make with your router.  I do know that Netgear designs their router radios+antennas as a system (as Elaine says, this is not a mod that they test).

 

 

Message 3 of 10
William10a
Master

Re: using single band antenna on dual band router

You could the old trick of making a half round reflector out of cardboard and cover the inside of with a aluminum foil. The antenna of the router is position in the center of the reflector side to side and front to back. A cheap way of booosting signal in deriction from the Linksys wrt54g router series.

Message 4 of 10
William10a
Master

Re: using single band antenna on dual band router

Try a trick marine industry uses place  a golden rod and  repaeter or outer set up as access point in plastiic box with vents to allow some  air to flow a small should be enough they run on 120 volts or 12 volts depends on the one you use. A golden rod is a small low temp heating element meant to keep electronics from freezing in a electronics box made from metal or filbr glass. A 100 light bulb can warm a box vary fast. Just carefill not use box the is paint a paint that contents metal like silver or gold colored paints they we even ruin a radar array antenna the stick turns around. 

Message 5 of 10
Pluto8
Apprentice

Re: using single band antenna on dual band router

I have an R7000 and had a 2.4 GHz directional antenna (11 dBi) connected to one of the antenna ports for about six months to test a special connection. This worked fine. Then of course I got good 2.4 and 5 GHz signals from the other two antennas on the router.

 

When you connect a 2.4 GHz only antenna to the router, you will get a big mismatch on 5 GHz, and most of that signal will be reflected into the RF circuit. But with these low power levels, there should not be any problem with heating. After my test, I verified that 5 GHz still worked: I disconnected the other two antennas and replaced them with 50 ohm terminators. There was still good signal on 5GHz from the port I used to test the directional antenna.

 

This will of course affect the advertised “beam forming” feature, but I am not sure how much this really works in practice.

 

I assume you have sorted out the problem with connectors: sma, rp sma, tnc, whatever. Then I would say, just go ahead and test this.

(But I don’t think below freezing temperatures will hurt an extender).

Message 6 of 10
StephenB
Guru

Re: using single band antenna on dual band router


@Pluto8 wrote:

 

(But I don’t think below freezing temperatures will hurt an extender).


I agree here.  An extender (or a PLW1010) would likely work, and avoid the need for directional antennas. 

 

Message 7 of 10
William10a
Master

Re: using single band antenna on dual band router

It's not the temp as much as it is the moisture in the air that electronics do not care for.  Most of the routers and extenders have temp range of 0 to 40 degrees C or 32 to 104 degrees F so may be a source heat like a heater is needed . Time will tell if it handle the temps and moisture in the air low temperatures and  moisture equals ice even a heater like you would place on your water pipes to keep them from freezing shoud help.

Message 8 of 10
StephenB
Guru

Re: using single band antenna on dual band router


@William10a wrote:

 Most of the routers and extenders have temp range of 0 to 40 degrees C or 32 to 104 degrees F so may be a source heat like a heater is needed .


I agree that sub-freezing temps are outside the spec.  But I have seen some at least one post here from someone else who's done this w/o running into any problems.

 

Another option that might work is an outdoor AP.  They generally use PoE, but of course you can use a power injector for that.  He would need to get cat6 out to the garage though (or to a suitable mount point on the outside of the house).  There are some inexpensive ones (likely older models) - for instance https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-TL-WA7210N-Outdoor-Wireless-150Mbps/dp/B00E8BWQPE

Message 9 of 10
William10a
Master

Re: using single band antenna on dual band router

It all depends on your location and how well it is protected. I would say try it as long as is housed inside the garage it's shield from the oustide maybe enough.

Message 10 of 10
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