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newbie posting a question

thegoogleman
Aspirant

newbie posting a question

Hi,

 

I have just wasted HOURS trying to compose and post a question, which is VERY complicated for me but the answer may be simple for those who may - eventually - see my question, because 'authentication' keeps 'failing', for some reason not known to me. I also keep seeing 'unexpected error occurred'.

 

Every single time I try to use the above 'Model' box...............

 

(I DO know the model names/numbers, but they are not 'authenticated' by THIS form despite them being ALL made by NETGEAR!!!!!!)

 

..............I see a drop down box TELLING me to verify the model name/number, when this same form will NOT allow me to enter the correct model name/number!!!!!! The 'choices' on offer are NOT the model I am using, but they ARE offered by THIS form so why woulld they then get rejected??????!!!!!

 

WTF?????!!!!!!'😩😡👊👎😟

 

So you can ignore the info in the 'model' box.

 

IF this post is actually posted, I will be very surprised, but just in case it does get posted - how the £&@%%^**!!!!! am I supposed to get help when I see nothing but errors and 'failures' every few seconds, on this useless form, when trying to write my question??????

 

Model: EDA500|ReadyNAS Expansion Chassis 5-Bay
Message 1 of 9
jak0lantash
Mentor

Re: newbie posting a question

Not convinced this is the most efficient way of asking for help...

Message 2 of 9
thegoogleman
Aspirant

Re: newbie posting a question

Hi

 

Thanks for your reply, I did not expect my post to even be posted.

 

I have tried several times since the post above to make it shorter or to choose a 'model' which WILL be 'authenticated' (even when it is the wrong one for my actual question) but it seems Netgear are more intereseted in preventing me asking ANY question - even about 'models' that ARE in their lists - never mind those that are NOT!

 

I would like to know how EXACTLY this form is supposed to be used, so I don't annoy 'helpers' AND so I can actually ask my original questions?????

 

Assuming THIS post is posted, here goes:

 

Are my 2x netgear XET1001 powerline plugs compatible with ANY currently available netgear powerline plugs?

 

Are ANY currently available netgear powerline plugs compatible with my WN3000RP V1H2 range extender?

 

Is MY WN3000RP V1H2 range extender compatible with my Sky Hub?

 

What is the 'speed' of this range extender, as I am sure it is not N300, never mind N600?

 

HOW should I proceed to connect my ranger extender to my SKY HUB (single band 2.4Ghz)?, so I can use it in my bedroom? I supposedly get 8.8Mbps from the modem/router connected by ethernet to my Mac or by wifi to my iOS devices, when they are in same room, MAX distance by line of sight 15 feet.

 

I have failed - despite several attempts - to connect my Smart TV (in my bedroom) to my SKY Hub (modem/router) via the range extender, despite it being reset to default.

 

The Smart TV currently uses BOTH powerline plugs to connect to my Sky Hub. Even using this method 'streaming' is slow, but streaming is impossible over WiFi directly from the Sky Hub since the speed is so slow that apps crash & skip items, every 20 seconds or sooner.

 

Can this range extender be used as a powerline plug via its ethernet port instead of using it as a WiFi range extender, or possibly as a powerline plug AT THE SAME TIME as being used as a ranger extender, so I can connect it to my Smart TV AND my iOS devices in my bedroom, and by so doing allow me to use one of the XET1001 powerline plugs to connect my multifunction printer via ethernet.

 

If it can be used as a powerline plug, can the wifi from this range extender be switched off, since I can't connect to it using the WiFi LAN of the Smart TV?

 

Thanks

 

Bob

 

🙂

Message 3 of 9
FramerV
NETGEAR Employee Retired

Re: newbie posting a question

Hi thegoogleman,

Let me transfer your post to appropriate forum for it to be answered accordingly. Thanks.

Regards,

Message 4 of 9
thegoogleman
Aspirant

Re: newbie posting a question

Hi FramerV,

Thanks for your reply & offer to move my post to the right forum area. If you think you could take either my whole post or my questions and some of the questions relevant 'background info' out of THIS posting to transfer it, you are welcome to do so, if that is possible.

I have now managed to 'solve' most (but not all) of the issues I was posting about:

i.e.

I used the 'WPS' buttons on the 'range extender' and then my 'modem/router' (within 2 minutes), which connected the 'range extender' to the modem/router and gave it an SSID that has, or can have a 'similar' name & network key.

This was done by connecting the range extender to a power socket very close to the modem/router to acheive the 'WPS button push route'.

It was a good thing my range extender has a WPS button because had not been able to connect to the 'set up' page for range extender using my smarthone/tablet - I do not have access to 'pc browser' to get to that page, & the browser on my mobile devices would not connect to the page.

I had always wondered what those buttons were for, and had not realised the range extender had this feature.

I have also discovered that (according to experts on a 'Samsung forum') I should not have had the range extender so close (within 5 inches, because of power socket location) to my Smart TV, because a range extender is supposed to be 'half-way' between the modem/router & 'the device that needs to connect to' the range extender.

Anyway, I was not aware of this so moved the range extender to a power socket outside my bedroom door (coincidentally about halfway between the modem/router & tv) & the tv now connects over wifi, but the speed is still too slow for youtube & the other 'smart tv apps' that actually work.

Unfortunately the ethernet port on the range extender only allows an ethernet connection to the TV, and still uses WiFi to connect the range extender (which is too slow in its' new location, & doesn't want to work at all right next to the TV) to the modem/router, so I am now using a pair of netgear powerline plugs (85mbps) to connect the Smart TV to the modem/router.

My living room is quite small (as is my bedroom) & the Max (straight line) distance between my modem/router & Smart TV is less 30 feet (with a solid, but thin stone/concrete wall in between them). I hope this method will prove to be 'fast enough' for 'streaming'. Time will tell.

My smartphone/tablet (when in bedroom) now gets a much better 'signal strength symbol' for longer, when connected via the range extender, than when trying to connect via the modem/router.

I have no idea how long the 'route by copper wire' is from the first 'powerline plug' (connected by ethernet cable to modem/router) is to the other one connected to my smart TV, but other experts have stated (elsewhere) that any device connected by ethernet cable to a modem/router either via an ethernet switch, powerline plug, range extender, or wireless access point will receive or transmit 'data' slower than if connected DIRECTLY to the modem/router ethernet ports.

I have no idea what 'data throughput speed' is possible from my modem/router at home via 'internal domestic copper line power circuits' when used with my old 85mbps powerline plugs when my current broadband speed is supposedly only 8.8mbps (according to my ISP), and just how this will relate to what 'speed' I will actually get in my bedroom whether for Smart TV via powerline, and Smartphone or Tablet via range extender, I also have no idea (I will have to find a website that checks broadband speeds, that I can use on my smartphone/tablet & smart tv browser - if it appears to be too slow) but I hope it will be fast enough.

Does any UK BASED expert on this forum know to calculate what the maximum data throughput capability is likely to be of the average UK domestic copper line power circuit in a small 4 room flat with a maximum internal footprint of about 23 foot by 23 foot?

Being that my 'download speed' (directly from the modem/router) is supposedly '8.8mbps' (according to my ISP), does anyone on this forum know whether the speed I should reasonably expect (whatever that is) ought to be fast enough to download a (SD or HD) movie or tv show at reasonable speed - say 2-3 minutes per hour of SD video (in my bedroom either via powerline plug or range extender)?

What is 'minimum required speed' for this anyway?

Being that my range extender is a 'V1H2' model version of a WN3000RP ranger extender, does anyone on this forum know what its actual speed should be?

Should I have any problem (except for possible compatibilty issues) using my XET1001 85mbps powerline plugs & ranger extender, with current netgear powerline plugs - the SLOWEST of which I can find near me are 'PL1000' models which are rated at '1000mbps'?

Being that 'fibre optic broadband' via fibre 'to premises' or 'to street cabinets' in this whole country (never mind that where I actually live fibre optic broadband is NOT available at all -yet) is unlikey to actually get anywhere near or exceed even 'N300' speeds in next few years (unless it is possibly delivered without use of 'street cabinets', as in the case of Virgin Media fibre optic cable) I fail to see why domestic market powerline plugs, range extenders, broadband modems and/or wired/wireless routers & wireless access points are now available at 'speeds' of well over 1200mbps! That is 'future proofing' taken to a ridiculous extreme, when these items cost so much money (compared to the cheapest items that are plenty fast enough) and are not needed in 'the average home'.

Thanks

Bob

🙂
Message 5 of 9
StephenB
Guru

Re: newbie posting a question

It will be hard to move this, since powerline and range extender products are in different forum areas.  One thing that is clear, is that there is nothing here about ReadyNAS (the product line for this particular area).

 


@thegoogleman wrote:



I have also discovered that (according to experts on a 'Samsung forum') I should not have had the range extender so close (within 5 inches, because of power socket location) to my Smart TV, because a range extender is supposed to be 'half-way' between the modem/router & 'the device that needs to connect to' the range extender.

Anyway, I was not aware of this so moved the range extender to a power socket outside my bedroom door (coincidentally about halfway between the modem/router & tv) & the tv now connects over wifi, but the speed is still too slow for youtube & the other 'smart tv apps' that actually work

Being that my range extender is a 'V1H2' model version of a WN3000RP ranger extender, does anyone on this forum know what its actual speed should be?.

Since all extenders relay the signal, you need to put it in a place where you get good reception from the Modem/Router, and where you also will get good signal quality at your devices.  Given the small footprint, the range extender location shouldn't be that criticial.  I suspect the concrete wall has rebar (iron/steel rods) inside - if so, that could explain the signal loss. 

 

The manual for your extender is here: https://www.netgear.com/support/product/WN3000RP.aspx?cid=wmt_netgear_organic

 

It has a max link speed of 300 mbits.  Real-world speed will be much less.  Normally I'd expect about 5 megabytes per sec (~40 mbits) with 802.11n clients (and an 802.11n main router).

 


@thegoogleman wrote:
 so I am now using a pair of netgear powerline plugs (85mbps) to connect the Smart TV to the modem/router.

Like wifi, the speed you actually get is much less than the maximum link speed that is advertised.  There's a lot of overhead, plus the real-world speed depends on circuit quality.  In your specific case, it depends on whether the circuit breaker box is in the apartment or somewhere else (for instance the basement) - since the electrical path between the powerline plugs runs through the circuit breaker box.

 

I saw a review that measured about 500 KB/sec - which is about 4 mbits.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fer20I3pVIE

 

Real-world speeds vary quite a bit, so use speedtest.net to measure what speeds you are getting (both through powerline and wifi).  Perhaps post back with the results you see.


@thegoogleman wrote:
I fail to see why domestic market powerline plugs, range extenders, broadband modems and/or wired/wireless routers & wireless access points are now available at 'speeds' of well over 1200mbps! 

One issue is that the link speeds used in advertising are so much higher then than actual throughput.  So 1200 mbps link speeds aren't as fast as they sound.

 

A second consideration is whether you have a file server (for instance a ReadyNAS) on your home network.  That can easily use a full gigabit of network throughput.

 

Plus (with all due respect) your ISP speed is pretty slow.  The slowest speed from my provider is 50 mbits.  Many places enjoy hundreds of mbits or even gigabit ISP speeds.

 


@thegoogleman wrote:



Does anyone on this forum know whether the speed I should reasonably expect (whatever that is) ought to be fast enough to download a (SD or HD) movie or tv show at reasonable speed - say 2-3 minutes per hour of SD video (in my bedroom either via powerline plug or range extender)?




A typical SD video bitrate is 1 mbit/s (perhaps 450 MB/hour).  A typical 1080p video has a bitrate around 11-12 mbits per second - 720p is perhaps half that. These are 'typical downloads" - full bluray or DVD rips will be a lot bigger, some lower-quality content will be somewhat smaller.

 

At your full ISP speed, it would take about 6-7 minutes to download an hour of 1 mbit video, and about 80 minutes to download an hour of 12 mbit 1080p content. Perhaps 3 hours to download a full 1080p movie (depending on length).  

 

You can stream an SD movie or even 720p from your ISP, but probably not 1080p.

 

The extender should keep up with your ISP speed.  The powerline might not - you'll need to check with speedtest.

 

 

 

 

 

Message 6 of 9
Sandshark
Sensei

Re: newbie posting a question

You came to an area called "Using your ReadyNAS" and were surprised/annoyed when it did not accept the model number of something that is not related in any way to a Readynas.  Hmm, doesn't sound like Netgear's the problem.

 

BTW, if you take too long to compose a message, it does sometimes give you a "failure to authenticate".  All you need to do is try again, and you will be prompted if you want to load your saved text.  It may not be quite up to date to where you left off, but it's better than starting from scratch.

Message 7 of 9
StephenB
Guru

Re: newbie posting a question


@Sandshark wrote:

You came to an area called "Using your ReadyNAS" and were surprised/annoyed when it did not accept the model number of something that is not related in any way to a Readynas.  Hmm, doesn't sound like Netgear's the problem.

 


Entering the model number is pretty painful though, so I think he has a point there.

Message 8 of 9
thegoogleman
Aspirant

Re: newbie posting a question

Hi Stephen B,

Thanks for your reply, and agreeing that having to enter a model number 'is pretty painful'.👍🙂

To Sandshark & everyone else who replied, many thank yous for your replies & helpful info, 🙂 and:

The only reason my post ended up at the 'ReadyNAS' thread is because I just chose that one at 'random', and I did not expect it to be actually posted. By that time I had about almost given up on ANY model number working, which is why my post was as much an angry rant as a help request. ALL other 'model numbers' I chose (including the one MOST relevant to my post) were rejected due to 'failed authentication' or 'mismatched ticket' errors. 😟

By that time I would have presumably spent far too long 'composing' my post, so 'error messages' would perhaps have been inevitable.😕

Bob

🙂
Message 9 of 9
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