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i just want to know what the voltage of the netgear wifi range extender ex3700 is since it is a wali

noyfirm
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i just want to know what the voltage of the netgear wifi range extender ex3700 is since it is a wali

 
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Razor512
Virtuoso

Re: i just want to know what the voltage of the netgear wifi range extender ex3700 is since it is a

That device seems to be a wall pluggable WiFi extender. Those types of devices simply take AC 120-240V input and run it through a full wave bridge rectifier, and use switching regulation and a bunch of filtering to output DC power to the rest of the unit. Since they don't have a separate power brick, there is no telling from the documentation as to what the internal voltage will be since they no longer need to meet a fixed input such as 12V (which is largely done to make things easier on the customer in terms of interoperability while also saving cost an adapter production and design can span multiple product generations).

 

If the item directly takes mains input, then the internal regulation will be more targeted to the needs of the circuit, e.g., if you have a bunch of DC to DC switching regulations for certain rails as well as a bunch of linear regulators for some low current draw components, you will probably regulate the mains down to an optimal range for those specific components, instead of designing it all to a fixed input voltage that everything from high to low end will use.

 

 

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Razor512
Virtuoso

Re: i just want to know what the voltage of the netgear wifi range extender ex3700 is since it is a

That device seems to be a wall pluggable WiFi extender. Those types of devices simply take AC 120-240V input and run it through a full wave bridge rectifier, and use switching regulation and a bunch of filtering to output DC power to the rest of the unit. Since they don't have a separate power brick, there is no telling from the documentation as to what the internal voltage will be since they no longer need to meet a fixed input such as 12V (which is largely done to make things easier on the customer in terms of interoperability while also saving cost an adapter production and design can span multiple product generations).

 

If the item directly takes mains input, then the internal regulation will be more targeted to the needs of the circuit, e.g., if you have a bunch of DC to DC switching regulations for certain rails as well as a bunch of linear regulators for some low current draw components, you will probably regulate the mains down to an optimal range for those specific components, instead of designing it all to a fixed input voltage that everything from high to low end will use.

 

 

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