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WAN OR LAN Port for Access Point

Howie411
Luminary

WAN OR LAN Port for Access Point

Question about using the Nighthawk R8700 as an AP.  The documents say connect a ethernet cable from the LAN on the primary router to either the WAN OR LAN on the netgear, but all the photos show it plugged into the WAN port.  Does it actually matter?  I'm guessing if I plug it into the WAN Port it would give me all 5 LAN ports to use also?

 

Also any idea why I can't access the routerlogin.net page in AP mode?  It seems the only way I can is to type in the IP address which since it gets randomly assigned, the only way I was able to find it was going into the primary router and checking.    I did end up changing it to a static IP address sl kt was easy to remember, but not sure why the login URL isn't working.

Message 1 of 12

Accepted Solutions
TheEther
Guru

Re: WAN OR LAN Port for Access Point

There are up to 2 ways to use a router as an Access Point.

 

  1. Enable AP Mode on those routers that offer this setting.  The illustrations usually show the WAN port being used.  In theory, a LAN port should work, but one user found a bug on the R7500 where traffic would stop flowing if the WAN port was disconnected (link).  I don't know if the R7800 has the same bug.
  2. Use the old school method.  Manually disable the DHCP server, set a static IP address in LAN Setup and connect a LAN port.  What's the difference?  Empirical speed tests performed by a user on another forum showed that AP Mode is significantly worse than this method.  It's believed that traffic that transits between the LAN and WAN ports incurs significantly much more packet processing.

AP Mode is easy to enable but the old school method should be superior.

 

The routerlogin.net trick relies on the router intercepting the DNS query sent by your computer and returning its own IP address instead of sending the query to a real DNS server.  I don't know if the router continues to intercept queries while in AP Mode, but it's also possible for the router to never see them.  When a router is in AP Mode, it is no longer the default gateway, so there may be devices whose packets never transit the router.

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Message 5 of 12

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Wolf_666
Luminary

Re: WAN OR LAN Port for Access Point

Any port is fine, then assign a static ip or be sure your router can resolve local IP. I personally assigned a static ip and named it as R7000.

- Modem Draytek Vigor 160
- Router Netgear RAX200 (Stock FW)
- NAS Synology DS1621+
Message 2 of 12
netwrks
Master

Re: WAN OR LAN Port for Access Point

The WAN port is the default so that all ports can be used, but the only thing that may, or may not work on another port is NTP.

The routerlogin links won't work because it is not a 192.168.x .1 IP address., 

Message 3 of 12
netwrks
Master

Re: WAN OR LAN Port for Access Point

The WAN port is the default so that all ports can be used, but the only thing that may, or may not work on another port is NTP.

The routerlogin links won't work because it is not a 192.168.x .1 IP address.

Message 4 of 12
TheEther
Guru

Re: WAN OR LAN Port for Access Point

There are up to 2 ways to use a router as an Access Point.

 

  1. Enable AP Mode on those routers that offer this setting.  The illustrations usually show the WAN port being used.  In theory, a LAN port should work, but one user found a bug on the R7500 where traffic would stop flowing if the WAN port was disconnected (link).  I don't know if the R7800 has the same bug.
  2. Use the old school method.  Manually disable the DHCP server, set a static IP address in LAN Setup and connect a LAN port.  What's the difference?  Empirical speed tests performed by a user on another forum showed that AP Mode is significantly worse than this method.  It's believed that traffic that transits between the LAN and WAN ports incurs significantly much more packet processing.

AP Mode is easy to enable but the old school method should be superior.

 

The routerlogin.net trick relies on the router intercepting the DNS query sent by your computer and returning its own IP address instead of sending the query to a real DNS server.  I don't know if the router continues to intercept queries while in AP Mode, but it's also possible for the router to never see them.  When a router is in AP Mode, it is no longer the default gateway, so there may be devices whose packets never transit the router.

View solution in original post

Message 5 of 12
Howie411
Luminary

Re: WAN OR LAN Port for Access Point

Thanks all for the info.

Message 6 of 12
Wolf_666
Luminary

Re: WAN OR LAN Port for Access Point

@TheEther Can you post the link to the other forum where the user experiensed worse performance in AP mode? 

 

I am interested and I will do some tests. At the moment I am in AP mode, in the past I was used to do the "old school".

Thanks.

- Modem Draytek Vigor 160
- Router Netgear RAX200 (Stock FW)
- NAS Synology DS1621+
Message 7 of 12
TheEther
Guru

Re: WAN OR LAN Port for Access Point


@Wolf_666 wrote:

@TheEther Can you post the link to the other forum where the user experiensed worse performance in AP mode? 

 

I am interested and I will do some tests. At the moment I am in AP mode, in the past I was used to do the "old school".

Thanks.


Had to search for it.  Found it (link).  If you want to cut to the chase, the assertion is raised in post #6 and the measurements are provided in post #10.  Posts #2 and #18 are also informative about hardware acceleration, which is at the root of the matter.

 

Note, you are likely to see a difference only at speeds about 450 Mbps.

Message 8 of 12
Pluto8
Apprentice

Re: WAN OR LAN Port for Access Point

I recently upgraded my access point from an old WNDR3700 to R7000. The main router is also R7000. With the new R7000 as access point I used the WAN port as suggested in the manual.

 

I have tested the transfer times: copying a 2065 MB file from a desktop wired to the router, wired connection to the access point and then wired connection to a laptop with SSD disk. I tested many times, and here are the average speeds:

 

WAN port: 395 Mbps

LAN port:   825 Mbps

 

So the LAN ports are just gigabit switches, while there is something extra going on from the WAN port.

Message 9 of 12
TheEther
Guru

Re: WAN OR LAN Port for Access Point


@Pluto8 wrote:

I recently upgraded my access point from an old WNDR3700 to R7000. The main router is also R7000. With the new R7000 as access point I used the WAN port as suggested in the manual.

 

I have tested the transfer times: copying a 2065 MB file from a desktop wired to the router, wired connection to the access point and then wired connection to a laptop with SSD disk. I tested many times, and here are the average speeds:

 

WAN port: 395 Mbps

LAN port:   825 Mbps

 

So the LAN ports are just gigabit switches, while there is something extra going on from the WAN port.


Read the link I provided above.  AP Mode disables hardware acceleration, so the CPU needs to handle packets going between the LAN and WAN ports.  The Broadcom chip can handle switching between LAN ports without CPU involvement.

Message 10 of 12
Howie411
Luminary

Re: WAN OR LAN Port for Access Point

One other thing I've noticed.

 

if its plugged into the WAN Port, under attached devices, I'm seeing everything,  my cable boxes, my PC, any Ethernet connected device.  When I had it in the LAN port all I saw was my Wireless devices.

Message 11 of 12
Howie411
Luminary

Re: WAN OR LAN Port for Access Point

Also I don't know if this is caused by setting it to AP mode, but under Statics:  I'm showing 100M/Full,  not sure why its not 1000 as I have a cat5e going from the Fios Router to the Netgear.

 

WAN100M/Full248342226037290672214501

01:03:45:33

 

 

Message 12 of 12
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