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Rndp6000

xtrips1
Aspirant

Rndp6000

hello,

I have 2 Readynas pro at hand right now. They look identical to me but I know they are different. What command line can I run via Putty to get all the information about the hardware inside? CPU? memory kind? Etc....

after I get the exact model of each one where can I get information about upgradability and performance gain? What kind of CPU is compatible? What kind of memory is compatible? How much memory can I add? I just upgraded both from version 4 to version 6. 

as you might have guessed Linux is not my best suit. So please keep it simple.

 

thank you

Message 1 of 7

Accepted Solutions
StephenB
Guru

Re: Rndp6000


@xtrips1 wrote:

Can I have a command that will give me more info anyway?


With putty (or ssh built into windows 10 and macos) you log in as root, and use the NAS admin password.

 

You can see the CPU info with

# cat /proc/cpuinfo

You can see the amount of RAM with

# free

To get more detailed information, you could install dmidecode.  Make sure you do this as root.

# apt-get install dmidecode
# dmidecode

I'm not sure if you can install dmidecode on a NAS with 4.2.x firmware (which is what the Pros shipped with).  But it can be installed if the NAS has been converted to run OS 6 firmware.

View solution in original post

Message 4 of 7

All Replies
StephenB
Guru

Re: Rndp6000

Look for a part number label (something like RNDP6000-200NAS).  The NAS at the end is the region, and so that bit will depend on where the units were sold.  The -200 is the relevant part.  The original NAS (Pro Pioneer Edition and Pro Business Edition models) will have a -100.  The second generation unit (which has a faster processor) will have the -200.

 

Both take DDR2 memory, and the stock amount is 1 GB.  They have 2 memory slots, and can take up to 8 GB, but compatible 4 GB modules are rare.  It's much easier to find 1 and 2 GB modules that will work.  Anything labeled "AMD" memory will not work.

Message 2 of 7
xtrips1
Aspirant

Re: Rndp6000

Thank you.
Can I have a command that will give me more info anyway?
I would like to be more in control.

Message 3 of 7
StephenB
Guru

Re: Rndp6000


@xtrips1 wrote:

Can I have a command that will give me more info anyway?


With putty (or ssh built into windows 10 and macos) you log in as root, and use the NAS admin password.

 

You can see the CPU info with

# cat /proc/cpuinfo

You can see the amount of RAM with

# free

To get more detailed information, you could install dmidecode.  Make sure you do this as root.

# apt-get install dmidecode
# dmidecode

I'm not sure if you can install dmidecode on a NAS with 4.2.x firmware (which is what the Pros shipped with).  But it can be installed if the NAS has been converted to run OS 6 firmware.

View solution in original post

Message 4 of 7
xtrips1
Aspirant

Re: Rndp6000

Thank you very much

Dmidecode works like a charm

Message 5 of 7
xtrips1
Aspirant

Re: Rndp6000

Since you are a guru, any trick you could share to choose the right memory DDR2 modules that will work and not be rejected? I can only order online. Anything specific I should look for in the dmidecode output to maximize my chances?

Message 6 of 7
Sandshark
Sensei

Re: Rndp6000

RAM must be unbuffered, non-ECC, and of 2Rx8 configuration (also sometimes called "low density"), not 2Rx4 (sometimes called "high density" or labeled "AMD Only").  4GB modules of that type are hard to find and expensive because computers that used them typically had 32-bit OSes limited to 4GB of RAM, so there was little market for them.  2GB modules are cheap, especially used on eBay.  Specs for the Ultra6 memory are the same, BTW.

 

I have had success with OCZ and AData brands low CL versions, and many swear by Patriot.  But they don't really seam to be picky.  The RAM is not dual-channel, so the sticks don't have to be matched.  I've not benchmarked how much improvement I get with the low CL sticks.

 

As for the CPU, if it's a -100 model NAS, it has a Pentium Dual E2160 @ 1.80GHz.  If it's a -200, it has a Pentium Dual E5300 @ 2.60GHz.  The fastest processor that can be installed with stock cooling is a Core2 Duo E7600 @ 3.06GHz, but then only if you have the latest BIOS (07/26/2010 FLAME6-MB V2.0), and the update must be done before you upgrade the processor.  If you are still running OS4.2.x, then a BIOS update is easy, except on some very early models that cannot be updated to that version (so i've read here -- never saw one).  It's much more difficult if you've upgraded to OS6 -- I found it easier to downgrade back to 4.2, update the bios, and re-convert (all done with a scratch drive, not a real volume).  FYI, the motherboard FSB is stuck at 800MHz, even with a processor like the E7600 that supports 1066MHz.

 

Frankly, the speed improvement from the E5300 to the E7600 is hardly worth the effort, even though you can buy the E7600 dirt cheap today, in large part because you don't get the FSB boost.  The upgrade from the E2160 is well worth it, IMHO, especially if you are going to run OS6.

 

Years ago, some tinkered with a quad-core of the same generation.  It worked, but overheated badly, and there is no room for a bigger heat sink or fan.  So unless you want to get into some radical cooling, don't do it.  Just buy a newer NAS if you need that kind of processing power.

 

The orignal Pro BE/Pro Pioneer (-100's), the Ultra4Plus, and the Pro6 (-200 model) all have the same motheboard (save those few early systems I mentioned earier).  In OS4.2.x, they just identify themselves differently to the OS and it turns on or off certain options.  If you upgrade to OS6, only the processor speed is going to make any difference -- it doesn't care which model you have.

 

And while you didn't ask, it seems the Ultra6Plus can have either processor.  I understand it was first intended to ship with the slower one when the Pro6 was shipping with the faster one.  But I have had two that had the faster one, so I guess the cost of building two configurations got to be more than the differential cost of the processors.

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