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JGS516v2 router backhaul issues

chicagobakh
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JGS516v2 router backhaul issues

I have been trying to get a TP-Link Deco system to work over Ethernet backhaul and this switch appears to not allow it.  Other signals (e.g., a laptop computer plugged into a separate ethernet port) work fine, but the backhaul does not.  

 

It looks like there are two typical causes of this.  The first is loopback detection, but I'm not sure this feature is even offered by the JGS516v2.  Is it?  If not, I presume that is not the issue.

 

The second is a refusal to relay signals based on IEEE 1901.5, which TP-Link relies upon for the backhaul. But it isn't clear to me why this would be a problem either, as an unmanaged switch is supposed to just pass along whatever packets it gets, without passing judgment on them.  

 

I'd appreciate any insight or alternative causes to consider.  Thanks.

Message 1 of 6
plemans
Guru

Re: JGS516v2 router backhaul issues

I haven't found an unmanaged switch that blocks backhaul. Being unmanaged, they don't do any traffic inspection/filtering. 

Message 2 of 6
schumaku
Guru

Re: JGS516v2 router backhaul issues

Not much to add to this: https://www.tp-link.com/us/support/faq/1794/ 

 

TP-Link Deco Ethernet Backhaul.PNG

 

 

No word of what is implicitly required .... ask TP-Link what "most switches on the market are"!

Message 3 of 6
schumaku
Guru

Re: JGS516v2 router backhaul issues

Ok, spent a little bit of spare time briefly flying over IEEE 1905.1a

 

======

IEEE Standard for a Convergent Digital Home Network for Heterogeneous Technologies Amendment 1: Support of New MAC/PHYs and Enhancements

IEEE Standard for a Convergent Digital Home Network for Heterogeneous Technologies Amendment 1: Support of New MAC/PHYs and Enhancements

 

An abstraction layer for multiple home networking technologies that provides a common interface to widely deployed home networking technologies is defined in this standard: IEEE 1901(TM) over power lines, IEEE 802.11(TM) for wireless, Ethernet over twisted pair cable, and MoCA 1.1 over coax. Additional network technologies are supported by an extensible mechanism using an IEEE OUI and an XML-formatted document. Connectivity selection for transmission of packets arriving from any interface or application is supported by the 1905 abstraction layer. Modification to the underlying home networking technologies is not required by the 1905 abstraction layer, and hence it does not change the behavior or implementation of existing home networking technologies. The 1905 abstraction layer is between layers 2 and 3 and abstracts the individual details of each interface, aggregates available bandwidth, and facilitates seamless integration. The 1905 abstraction layer also facilitates end-to-end quality of service (QoS) while simplifying the introduction of new devices to the network, establishing secure connections, extending network coverage, and facilitating advanced network management features including discovery, path selection, autoconfiguration, and QoS negotiation.

======

 

Digging a little bit deeper unveils the definition for the OUI - the "addressing" lets say.

 

The OUI Datatype Type is defined made up on a pattern with the values "([0-9a-fA-F]{2}:){2}[0-9a-fA-F]{2}"


Datatype for representing OUI. Examples: 01:80:C2:, 01:05:10, etc. 

 

This datatype restricts each field of the OUI to have exactly 2 digits that are hexadecimal digits, i.e., [0-9a-fA-F][0-9a-fA-F]:[0-9a-fA-F][0-9a-fA-F]

 

(Indeed, everything publicly accessible in the GenericPhyInfoV1.xsd - I have just made it a little bit more human-friendly for reading and explaining).

 

Let's map this now to a L2 switch. Nothing difficult: The MAC address consists of 6 octets. The first 3 octets of the MAC address are the OUI.

 

This makes me believe that some switches - like the subject JSG516v2 - don't forward these addresses, very likely simply filtered, or say not explicitly allowed.

 

This looks to me like some work to for Netgear resp. the switch OEM. Not sure they will jump on this work - even if we talk of IEEE standards valid since about 10 years. Difficult for models already on the EoL list, and even more difficult for unmanaged switches without any user loadable firmware. Feasible -probably- for the non-EoL Plus models with the "E" in the designation - permitting the OEM can make it happen. 

 

@Iphie_C please. cc @ChristineT 

Message 4 of 6
ReneD
NETGEAR Moderator

Re: JGS516v2 router backhaul issues

Hello @chicagobakh,

 

And welcome to the NETGEAR Community! 🙂

 

Can you check if setting up the TP link deco wired backhaul will also work with other unmanaged switch. What are the status of the leds on the switchport when the Deco device is connected? It will be best to open a support case so Netgear can investigate this further. Or more likely a limitation on Deco setting up a wired backhaul since it requires the satellite to be connected directly to the Main Deco lan port?

 

https://www.tp-link.com/us/support/faq/1794/

 

Have a lovely day,

 

Rene D 
Netgear Team
 

Message 5 of 6
schumaku
Guru

Re: JGS516v2 router backhaul issues


@ReneD wrote:

Can you check if setting up the TP link deco wired backhaul will also work with other unmanaged switch.


Not @chicagobakh if you don't mind - we have remote access to some customer environments with TP Link Deco systems, connected to unmanaged switches resp. ISP supplied router LAN ports. Afraid, I have no systems connected to the customer networks for capturing traffic. 8-) 

Message 6 of 6
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