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Tutor

Best choice for >150' linear coverage

I am trying to pick the best Orbi kit for my application.  Currently I am using an ASUS AC1900 router with a TP-Link RE-580D extender. The router is about 50' from the extender servicing a guest house about 150' away (200' total).  It works but I think the Orbi might work better.

 

I purchased an RBK33 kit (RBR40 router and two RBW30 wall plug satellites) somewhat based on information that the satellites will be daisy chain capable soon.  If true, that appears to be a good option for me; place one satellite 50' from the router and the other in the guest house. The other option is exchange the RBK33 for an RBK50 (better router and one satellite).  I do not need ethernet on the satellite.

 

We live in a rural area and our ISP is provided wirelessly. Reliable but not very fast (14Mb down, 5Mb up).  The main house uses 4 - 5 computers (including a server), plus phones, tablets, DirecTV, Amazon Fire...  The guest house uses Xbox, two computers and phones.  So far we have not run into any buffering problems with our current set up.

 

The RBK33 may work as well as my current set up right out of the box without the daisy chain upgrade.  Any news or comments?

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Apprentice

Re: Best choice for >150' linear coverage

The satellites are not daisy chain comparable. Sorry that you may have gotten the wrong impression or wrong information from somewhere. All Orbi systems each satellite only talks to the "main Orbi router". There is no mesh or multi hop type thing with an Orbi system.

In your situation and with what you bought you would have to place the main Orbi router between the house and guest house and then a satellite in each property and see how much coverage that gives you.
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Tutor

Re: Best choice for >150' linear coverage

Yes I am aware that the satellites are not currently daisy chainable.  The customer service rep I spoke with insisted that they will be through an upgrade in the near future.  When I challenged her on this she didn't know a timeline only that it was in the works.  I had read that somewhere else as well but it wasn't clear if that included the wall plug satellites.

 

The Asus AC1900 is working well covering the house from a corner location so I think the Orbi will work without a satellite for that.  Though your suggestion would be optimal, I can't relocate it closer to the guest house.

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Master

Re: Best choice for >150' linear coverage

There is a chance that new firmware will add the ability to connect the Orbi router and satellites using a wire.  I've never heard any talk of adding the ability to daisy chain them, either wired or wirelessly. That would be interesting though.

 

For what you are doing a wireless bridge with directional antenna would be the best technical solution.

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Tutor

Re: Best choice for >150' linear coverage

Having eliminated the option of future daisy chaining the Orbi satellites, I have a some options to consider and would like some input.  Both options would include using the TP-Link RE580D extender and replacing my Asus AC1900 (model RT-AC68R) router with an Orbi.

 

Option A: Keep the RBK33 kit.  Maybe use one of the wall plug satellites in the house.

Option B: Sell or exchange the RBK33 kit for a RBK50 kit.  Maybe use the RBS50 in the house. Price is about the same.

 

Other than the hours it would take to reconfigure our network, what option looks the best?

 

 

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Tutor

Re: Best choice for >150' linear coverage

Now that the Orbi is daisy-chain capable, maybe it will work for my application after all.  I would be interested in anyones experience with the daisy-chain feature re: how it extended in linear feet.  Specifically, anyone using two RBW30 satellites

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Master

Re: Best choice for >150' linear coverage

 

Unless you plan to put an Orbi satellite midway between your two buildings, I do not expect the wireless daisy-chaining to buy you anything.  The 5 GHz backhaul signal will not travel well through a minimm of two exterior walls separated by 150'.

 

Your best solution is still a wireless bridge, but let's see if anyone has experience with the feature.

 

 

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Luminary

Re: Best choice for >150' linear coverage

I, too, believe a wireless bridge is your best bet for decent performance and minimum hassle. I personally use an EnGenius ENS202 to bridge to my pool equipment from my ORBI. The distance between them is about 80' with a concrete block wall 15' from the ORBI that the 2.4 gHz signal has no trouble penetrating. I've not done a "max distance test" but I can tell you that the ENS202 "sees" nearly every 2.4 gHz signal in my neighborhood–up to almost a mile away!

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